Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014

Why one should not vote AAP

The belief in referendums is strong within the philosophy of the AAP; it seems to have a contemptuous disregard for leadership and believes that all knotty problems can be solved by a mohalla vote.  IE The belief in referendums is strong within the philosophy of the AAP; it seems to have a contemptuous disregard for leadership and believes that all knotty problems can be solved by a mohalla vote. C R sasikumar
Written by Surjit S Bhalla | Posted: January 18, 2014 12:24 am | Updated: January 17, 2014 11:58 pm

It is not that I dislike Congress less, but that I dislike AAP more

Most of last year, until the very end, the conventional and universal belief was that Election 2014 was an old/ new two-way fight between Narendra Modi of the BJP and Rahul Gandhi of the Congress. Ideologies were balanced into their respective boxes but the weight of economic evidence at the Centre and the radically different economic performance of Modi in Gujarat meant that the odds were in favour of Modi winning the general election. Most believed that the Congress would be hard-pressed to cross a hundred seats, more than halving their 2009 tally. The BJP under Modi was likely to get 180 seats (upwards of the first opinion poll forecasts of 120 seats) and even with 20-odd seats by its allies in Maharashtra (Shiv Sena) and Punjab (Akali Dal), BJP+ would be hard-pressed to cross 200. Given 73 short of requirement, there was healthy talk of the Third Front leading from behind.

And then Delhi happened and the Aam Aadmi Party arrived on the national scene. Suddenly, the Third Front idea is no more idle chatter, but a distinct possibility. Forget the Third Front, there are many who argue that the AAP will get close to 100 seats. So Prashant Bhushan, senior member of the trinity ruling the AAP (along with Arvind Kejriwal and Yogendra Yadav), can be forgiven for indulging  in a bit of hyperbole when, on the day the AAP announced it was going to contest only 300 of the 543 seats, he proudly boasted that there was no reason why the AAP could not get 400!

The AAP party has been in power for only three weeks, but it has not been sitting idle. As befits
a national party (though at this stage strictly a wannabe one), it has made pronouncements on economics, law and order, and foreign and social policy.

The AAP has been busy — but has it been good? The party has several “natural” advantages over old workhorses like the Congress and the BJP. It is refreshingly young, modern and media savvy. The last attribute seems to be part of a well-thought-out strategy — enrol and give senior positions to journalists. Journalists control the media, and incestuous journalists are extremely loathe to criticise fellow travellers.

Possibly the most distinguishing feature of the AAP is its commitment to eradicate corruption. Though eradication may not be feasible in the short run, the goal is clearly a lofty one. Who amongst us does not want continued…

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