View From The Right: The light around us

The Organiser editorial says though there is “talk about denigrating or defaming Hindu festivals and sentiments” and “despite the restrictions on firecrackers” the mood will remain upbeat.

Published: October 18, 2017 12:50 am
Diwali, Diwali festiwal, Diwali firecrackers sale ban, supreme court, Congress, BJP, Doklam, Doklam standoff, beef ban, Indian express, Diwali 2017, Deepawali 2017, Diwali significance, diwali lakshmi puja why, diwali puja spiritual reason, diwali puja reason, Diwali celebration, Deepawali celebration, Indian express, Indian express news If prosperity and satisfaction is wanted then the ambition has to be linked with the concerns of the community, says the Panchjanya editorial.

Editorials and cover stories of the latest issues of Panchjanya and Organiser celebrate the spirit of Diwali. Their focus is not its religious importance for Hindus, but the cover stories of both the magazines celebrate the dozens of people and organisations that work for public good. The Good Samaritans include people who have dedicated their lives for the betterment of poor by educating them, opening healthcare centers in villages across the country. Among the organisations mentioned are those involved in preserving folk culture, monuments in different parts of India, and institutions who work towards imparting Vedic education to young students.

If prosperity and satisfaction is wanted then the ambition has to be linked with the concerns of the community, says the Panchjanya editorial. It says the subjects of the cover story have spread the light of positivism and cooperation around them. “These stories are really unique because they demonstrate that instead of just collecting, a person can gather a lot by distributing too,” it says.

Similarly, the Organiser editorial says though there is “talk about denigrating or defaming Hindu festivals and sentiments” and “despite the restrictions on firecrackers” the mood will remain upbeat.

Media and motives

An article on the Indian media in Panchjanya starts by saying that “since the Congress has lost power at the Centre, dozens of so-called news websites have sprouted like mushrooms”. It claims these websites are backed by well-established journalists, who are dedicated to the Congress. It raises doubts about the funds received by these websites and says they want to remove the pro-Hindutva government and replace it with the Congress. The article describes the trend as “hit-job journalism”.

The article calls the report on Jay Shah in The Wire as fictitious. It says though the news website had to make some changes to its story to “remove mischievous mistakes”, the secular mainstream media “in a pre-decided manner” wants to take the story forward. It claims that most journalists prefer the “corrupt” ways of the Congress. Remarks like the one by the Air Force Chief that India is capable of handling a two-front attack, the article says, is criticised by the media, which is “anti-national in its roots”.

Also, the article claims that when the UP government tried to promote religious tourism in Ayodhya, the media coloured it by alleging that the state is trying to “diminish the importance of Taj Mahal”. The article adds that for the media everything is fine as long as tourism is promoted only on the basis of Mughal history. “If the quality of journalism is going down, such half-baked journalists have a huge role,” the article concludes.

China’s allies

Panchjanya has an article about the invasion of the Indian market by Chinese goods. It claims that Chinese-made mobile phones, toothpaste and even Diwali diyas have taken over the country because of the celebrities who promote them. The gap between India’s imports from China and its exports to China is huge, the article says.

From the “sky to the ground”, billboards advertise Chinese-made mobile phones. Some people become stars by gaining fame through Indian movies, and then they become specialists on every subject. “Ranvir Singh Chinese,” says the piece talking about the actor “recommending” Chinese phones. It names Deepika Padukone, Virat Kohli and Alia Bhatt as other examples of stars promoting Chinese products in the country. Over half the phones used in India are made in China, including the Korean Samsung, it points out, and blames Indian industrialists for not being able to produce goods to match the Made in China products. “Many Indian groups are running a campaign to boycott Chinese products,” it says, but love for “cash” loses in front of love for the nation. “Chinese can threaten in Doklam, that works; Chinese phone also works in the country,” the article says.

Love thy cow

Panchjanya has an article that discusses the orders of the last Mughal emperor, Bahadur Shah Zafar, protecting the sacred cow. The article talks of Shah’s orders to maintain unity between the Hindus and Muslims in 1857, when both had come together against the British colonisers. The last of the four orders passed by Shah said that anyone who will kill a cow, calf or ox will be punished by death, according to the article. Such orders banned killing cows even in Bareilly and Awadh.

The article argues that it is every Indian’s responsibility, Hindu and Muslim, to protect the cow family. It calls for the government to introduce death penalty for anyone involved in, or promoting, the killing of any member of the cow family. Further, the article wants poems that will promote love and devotion for cow among children in school textbooks.

Compiled by Krishn Kaushik

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