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An editorial says that Modi, in his first Independence Day speech, had spoken about making India an industrial hub.

Written by Manoj C G | Published: October 22, 2014 12:38 am
An editorial says that Modi, in his first Independence Day speech, had spoken about making India an industrial hub. In the US, he spoke repeatedly of “Make in India”. An editorial says that Modi, in his first Independence Day speech, had spoken about making India an industrial hub. In the US, he spoke repeatedly of “Make in India”.

Make hay in India

The CPM’s People’s Democracy argues that Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s “Make in India” campaign is an “open invitation” to foreign capital, the objective of which, it claims, has always been to maximise profits using cheap labour and resources. An editorial says that Modi, in his first Independence Day speech, had spoken about making India an industrial hub. In the US, he spoke repeatedly of “Make in India”.

“The former is propagated declaring the strengthening of India’s domestic industrial base while the latter is an open invitation for foreign investments… Their main objective remains profit maximisation and not augmenting India’s productive capacities. India, thus, appears ready to further liberalise its economy by further opening up of our markets, resources and cheap labour… This is the surest recipe for imposing further hardships on the Indian people,” it says.

Simultaneously, it noted that the RSS and other Sangh Parivar outfits are employing an “old stratagem… pursuing neoliberal economic policies imposing greater burdens on the people, [while] sharpening communal polarisation and, thus, seek to reap the consequential electoral benefit,” it says.

Bolivian example

The CPI says it is time the Left in India took a leaf out of the notebooks of its counterparts in Latin America and project a concrete alternative to neoliberal economic policies. An editorial in New Age discusses the re-election of Evo Morales in Bolivia and states that Bolivia is among about a dozen Latin American countries that have voted clearly and decisively in favour of candidates and parties that are opposed to the course of neoliberalism imposed by the IMF and World Bank, and have joined forces to chalk out alternative policies.

“After the disintegration of the Soviet Union and collapse of the socialist regimes in Eastern Europe, the protagonists of finance capital have pronounced the end of history and offered neoliberalism as the only path of development,” it says. “The protagonists of neoliberalism tried to term the crisis as recession, double and triple recession but the crisis continued to deepen. Basic facilities like education, healthcare, pensions and subsidies were cut and even retrenchment and cut in wages were resorted to. But nothing worked and the crisis persists,” it claims. But leaders in different Latin American countries like Venezuela, Bolivia, Brazil and Chile have come up with
an alternative model.

“The re-election of [the] Bolivian president for the consecutive third term is an assertion for this alternative… in our country, the new regime is bent upon pursuing the very disastrous course of neoliberalism more shamelessly… it is not just the slogan-mongering that will have an impact. People’s consciousness has to be roused and concrete alternative policies have to be projected,” it argues.

RECASTING POLITICS

The continuous electoral successes of the BJP may force the opposition to recast its political outlook, the CPI(ML) feels. “For long, bourgeois opposition politics in India evolved and revolved around the axis of anti-Congressism. Following the rise of the BJP as a powerful national contender since the 1990s, attempts were made to carve out an anti-Congress anti-BJP opposition space. Now, with the BJP emerging as the preeminent party of the ruling classes… the opposition logic may well shift to anti-BJPism,” an editorial in ML Update says.

“But with the Congress still in a state of free fall and regional parties having no ideological-political inhibition to doing business with a resurgent BJP, it is not easy for anti-BJPism to evolve as a uniting formula for a fragmented opposition,” it opines.

As far as the Left is concerned, it says the narrow frames of anti-Congressism or anti-BJPism can never be suitable for its agenda of radical social transformation, comprehensive democracy and alternative politics of the non-ruling non-exploiting classes. “The unprecedented rise of the BJP signals an ideological consolidation and resurgence of the right-wing in Indian politics and the Left must get ready to combat it by re-emerging as the ideological pivot of a bold and broad popular opposition…” it says.

On the verdicts in Maharashtra and Haryana, it says the two states were ripe for a change in government.

Compiled by Manoj C.G.

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  1. C
    CommiesSuck
    Oct 22, 2014 at 9:42 am
    These bunch of smoke some really potent drug to continue staying in their dreamland!
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    1. P
      Prashanth
      Oct 23, 2014 at 3:05 pm
      Using catch words like 'neo-liberal' will not cut ice. Tell us, practically, what you'd want to do to create jobs in the country. Honestly reckon with the fact that pre-91 policies failed in multiple dimensions. Then we can have a conversation. Otherwise you're just preaching to the choir.
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