The Urdu Press: Nawaz Sharif’s Exit

“It is being said that in Pakistan what the (military) establishment wants is done. The army there was not happy with the politics of Nawaz Sharif and his efforts for better relations with India. There has been slow progress in the legal action against other people whereas the judiciary showed extreme promptness in the matter relating to Nawaz Sharif.”

Written by Seema Chishti | Published: August 11, 2017 12:09 am
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Inquilab, in its editorial on July 31, writes, “The decision of the Pakistani judiciary to disqualify PM Nawaz Sharif leading to his exit is an extremely courageous step and not applauding it would be against the tenets of justice… It should be remembered that the Panama leaks had revealed secrets about many countries. In most of these cases, no action was taken against those involved in corruption. But in Pakistan a very serious action has been taken. Therefore, it is not surprising that the Pakistani judiciary has been praised for this step at the international level.”

Roznama Khabrein, in its editorial on August 4, notes, “It is being said that in Pakistan what the (military) establishment wants is done. The army there was not happy with the politics of Nawaz Sharif and his efforts for better relations with India. There has been slow progress in the legal action against other people whereas the judiciary showed extreme promptness in the matter relating to Nawaz Sharif.” The paper adds: “Shahid Khaqan Abbasi has assumed the office of the interim PM supposedly to give way to Nawaz’s brother, Shahbaz Sharif, who is currently the chief minister of Punjab. But it is possible that Abbasi may continue as the PM till the next elections as Shahbaz’s quitting the Punjab post of CM may cause some problems for Muslim League (Nawaz) in that important state.”

Rashtriya Sahara, in its editorial on July 29, writes, “Nawaz Sharif was the only Pakistani politician who had talked of better relations with India during his election campaign and the people supported him greatly leading to his becoming the prime minister. Presently, it is difficult to say what effect Sharif’s exit would have on Pakistan’s relations with India.”

Siasat, in its editorial on July 29, writes, “In Pakistan, there is now the need for a systematic movement for bringing about transparency and cleanliness in governance instead of the promotion of the families of those in power. But the acute problems of Pakistan cannot be solved merely by the efforts of political parties. For a movement, the people in general would have to come forward.”

India-China Stand-Off

Roznama Khabrein, in its editorial on August 8, writes: “China is not desisting from issuing threatening statements on the standoff on Doklam… External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj has very clearly stated India’s stand on the issue in Parliament and the entire country is supportive of her view that wars do not solve problems. Even after a war, talks are imperative and dialogues are the only way implying, that India does not pay any heed to such threats. It is ready for talks but it would withdraw its forces only when China too does so. It will not act unilaterally in this matter… Yet China is continuously provoking India. In its new move, it has started wooing India’s nearest neighbour and friend, Nepal. However, it is reported that Sushma Swaraj would visit Nepal next week, sensing China’s intentions.”

Inquilab, in its editorial on August 4, writes, “India’s initiatives leading to the maturing of its economic, political and cultural ties with various countries and the strengthening of its own economy have not been digested by Beijing and it is trying to lower the image of India and contain these initiatives. We should not be swayed by our perceived nearness to Washington. In spite of occasional hiccups, the economic relations between Washington and Beijing are very deep. Thus, we should plan our strategy keeping in view our own interests and avoid confrontation as far as possible and resolve all sensitive issues through dialogue.”

Cross-hairs Mystery

Hindustan Express, in an editorial on August 4, writes: “The fear of the cutting of braids of women in a mysterious manner has spread to many parts of north and central India. In Agra, a barbaric crowd killed a 65-year-old Dalit woman on the charge of roaming around, cutting the braids of some women. But fact she had lost her way in the dark. However, the reports of such incidents of hair cutting have no coherence or uniformity. The only common thing that has come up is the victims losing consciousness before such an incident even though it cannot be said with certainty that it is actually true. It should also to be noted that all the victims are extremely poor and illiterate… Such cases place a question mark on our modern system and development of the society. Even today, cases of child-sacrifice and the existence of alleged witches are being reported. The local administration too is not in a position to say anything for certain about the hair cutting of women. All that is being said is that no heed should be paid to rumours.”

The editor of Inquilab, Shakeel Shamsi, in his signed column on August 6, laments that even some Muslim women have started getting afraid of the rumours around women’s hair cutting even though there is no place in Islam for the sort of ghosts and evil spirits that could be responsible for the types of incidents that are being reported. There is a need for us all to allay the fears and apprehensions of people.”

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