Friday, Oct 24, 2014

The great communicator

He loves public speaking, does so often knowing that in today’s world, silence is not golden. He is eloquent with an actor’s theatrical sense of the occasion. His timing and delivery are faultless. (PTI) He loves public speaking, does so often knowing that in today’s world, silence is not golden. He is eloquent with an actor’s theatrical sense of the occasion. His timing and delivery are faultless. (PTI)
Written by Shailaja Bajpai | Posted: May 22, 2014 12:29 am

In one sense at least, the new PM will be a dramatic change from the old.

What an occasion to have a meltdown. In public. Before his party members. With the entire nation watching — or at least those who watched the telecast live in the morning or the repeat in the evening. There, inside Parliament’s august Central Hall, where journalist Kumar Ketkar (CNN-IBN) reminded us Jawaharlal Nehru had given his stirring speech on the eve of Independence. There, Narendra Modi choked.

He fought back the tears but not before they had sneaked into the speech he was delivering after the BJP MPs elected him their leader on Tuesday. He looked away so that no one would see him, believe it or not, lose control; he paused and paused, took a sip of water before humbly, hoarsely, thanking “maa”. The man who was all fire and brimstone during the election campaign, who seems to have iron in his soul (and the soles of his feet, considering how much walking he’s done in the last six months), had gone soft.

India’s next prime minister is human, after all. Before this uncharacteristic breakdown, Modi had knelt with folded hands and then saluted the steps of Parliament with his forehead. He was the epitome of respect and reverence — nobody could have faulted his behaviour. Of course, it had elements of grandstanding and drama: Modi is a consummate performer, the great communicator. He knows how to use every public event to maximum effect. He loves public speaking, does so often knowing that in today’s world, silence is not golden. He is eloquent with an actor’s theatrical sense of the occasion. His timing and delivery are faultless. Notice that he speaks spontaneously without being prompted by typed-out notes.

This is vastly different from the last 10 years, when the three most important persons in the government and the ruling party — Manmohan Singh, Sonia Gandhi and Rahul Gandhi — spoke so rarely and sparingly, you’d think words were their greatest foes.

Tuesday was Modi’s day entirely, with the media following him everywhere he went: Parliament, Rashtrapati Bhavan and then to Maninagar in the evening for another speech. For those who missed his morning’s speech, DD News thoughtfully replayed it at prime-time in the evening. After seeing very little of Modi on the public broadcaster thus far, we will now see a great deal of him in future. How things change — and remain the same.

When news TV could tear itself away from Modi, it devoted itself to forming his cabinet for continued…

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