Tuesday, Sep 16, 2014
The treaty is the successor to a series of agreements negotiated between the British Raj and the Kingdom of Nepal through the 19th and early 20th centuries. The treaty is the successor to a series of agreements negotiated between the British Raj and the Kingdom of Nepal through the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Written by C Raja Mohan | Posted: August 6, 2014 12:10 am

Nepal Treaty

The intimacy and intensity of the relationship between the people of Nepal and India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi suggested in his speech to the Constituent Assembly in Kathmandu, can’t be measured by “pieces of paper” signed by the governments of the two countries. The PM’s reference to “pieces of paper” was not a rhetorical device. It referred to the 1950 “India-Nepal Treaty of Peace and Friendship” between the two governments, which is supposed to codify the special relationship between the two countries. The treaty is the successor to a series of agreements negotiated between the British Raj and the Kingdom of Nepal through the 19th and early 20th centuries.

The Nepali elite sees the treaty as unequal and the symbol of Indian “hegemony” over Nepal. New Delhi, on the other hand, points to the unique benefits that Nepalese people enjoy in India, including national treatment, an open border and vast employment opportunities. Delhi also points to the fact that all provisions that favour India in the treaty have long gone into disuse; and that the treaty’s inequalities are all in favour of Nepal.

Recognising, however, that the treaty had become a lightning rod for anti-India sentiment in Nepal, the Atal Bihari Vajpayee government agreed, nearly a decade and a half ago, to jointly review its provisions with Kathmandu. Delhi has since complained that Nepal’s leaders publicly raise the demand for a treaty review, but do not come up with any specific suggestions on how. Put simply, the treaty has become a device for Nepal’s leaders to posture against India, without ever taking the responsibility to suggest its revision.

Modi’s Promise

The PM appears to have taken the treaty bull by the horns. He reportedly told Nepal’s prime minister, Sushil Koirala, “You can do exactly what you want with this treaty. You can remove it, you can change it. Come up with a proposal and I will accept it.” Reports also suggest that Modi was eager to have a new treaty in place before the end of his five-year tenure as PM in 2019. In his address to Nepali leaders at the banquet given by Koirala, Modi urged them not to make the treaty a political issue and invited them to bring forward ideas to recast it.

The joint statement issued at the end of Modi’s visit said, “the two prime ministers agreed to review, adjust and update the Treaty of Peace and Friendship of 1950”. The two sides also agreed that “the revised treaty should better reflect the current realities and aim to further consolidate and expand the multifaceted and deep-rooted relationships in a forward-looking manner”. That the ball continued…

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