Fifth column: Welcome this election

There is a sense of drift and failure that frightens those Indians who are not committed Congress voters.

Written by Tavleen Singh | Updated: March 9, 2014 10:52 am

Elections. And, once more a time to talk of ‘cabbages and kings’. As I watched the Chief Election Commissioner announce dates for polling last week, I found myself thinking how different the mood is this time. In 2009, when the Sonia-Manmohan government won a second term, it was, in my view, for two reasons. The first was that when the choice for prime minister became between the good doctor and the BJP’s man of steel, Dr Manmohan Singh looked much better. The second was that because the economy was booming, there was a buoyant, seductive hope in the air. A sense of possibilities, a certainty of things getting better for India, and this was especially true among the urban middle class. So it was from the cities that the Congress got its extra seats.

This time we go to the polls in a mood of bleak despair. There is a sense of drift and failure that frightens those Indians who are not committed Congress voters. If Narendra Modi is twice as popular as Rahul Gandhi, as recent polls indicate, it is because of an overwhelming belief across India that the country has been leaderless for a long while. Sonia Gandhi’s decision to play Noor Jehan behind the throne while waiting for her son to grow up was a bad one. This became painfully obvious in Singh’s second term because, when he realised that he was only a regent, he became silent and removed and so obviously subordinate to Rahul that it was embarrassing.

Had our real prime minister, Sonia, come forward and accepted responsibility for decisions and laws imposed on the government by her personally, things may perhaps have worked better. This did not happen as she chose instead, on account of her mysterious illness, to fade into the shadows herself.  So rogue ministers became unbridled and incompetent ones got away with criminal incompetence. Unfortunately, this has been especially true in important ministries like Defence, Home and External Affairs, where qualifying depended not on merit but on loyalty to the Dynasty. Loyalty, alas, is of absolutely no use when it comes to matters of governance, so the sense of the Government of India cruising along on autopilot enhanced the general sense of drift. This happened at a time when the rupee started to lose its value, the economy began to slow down and when corruption scandals started tumbling out of the cupboards of senior ministers. It did not help that when these crises occurred, our two and a half prime ministers had nothing to say between them.

Then there is this new factor that has come into play. From conversations with people I meet on my travels, I have discovered that there is a deepened awareness of what can be expected from governments. Those times when a leader’s ‘charisma’ could swing elections have been replaced by an increasingly aggressive demand for real governance. People will continuously vote out governments when they see that their lives have not improved, and in the past five years things have definitely not improved for anyone. Rich Indians feel the decline because of disappearing investments and in the stalling of infrastructure projects. So they hang on to their money or invest it in other countries. Middle-class urban Indians feel it in the drying up of jobs and the poor feel the pain of rising prices more than anyone else.

It is because of this general disgruntlement that Modi has managed to emerge as a national leader in so short a time. And, it is because of this disgruntlement that Arvind Kejriwal has positioned himself as a messiah who has been sent by the gods to cleanse India of corruption. He may not have been able to do anything for Delhi in the governance department, but he is still popular enough for TV reporters to follow him in droves as he wandered about Gujarat this week picking holes in Modi’s development model.

The purpose of this excursion appears to have been to paint Modi in the same colours as the Congress, in the hope that voters would see only Kejriwal as the shining new hope in a landscape of corrupt leaders. He may not succeed in this, but his targeting of Modi rather than Rahul indicates that he knows who is more likely to be his real rival if he wants to become prime minister himself. Or could there be other reasons? Could it be true that he is the Congress’s B-team?

It does not matter anyway because the only thing that can be said for certain now is that the Sonia-Manmohan government is on its way out. When it goes, there will be few people who will mourn because they have presided over a wasted decade. The next prime minister has his work cut out for him.

Follow Tavleen Singh on Twitter @ tavleen_singh

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First Published on: March 9, 2014 1:06 am
  1. P
    PN
    Mar 9, 2014 at 10:37 am
    Well put - especially the last two sentences of penultimate paragraph
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      Playfair
      Mar 9, 2014 at 3:30 pm
      The media is creating a monster out of the AAP. India cannot afford instability. AAP have turned out to be a flop show and a huge disappointment.
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        Ashutosh
        Mar 9, 2014 at 5:40 pm
        Kejriwal's motivation and modus opei are very curious indeed. If he wants to get rid of corruption ,how on earth can he soft peddle the mive insutionalized corruption of UPA's last decade. His going after Modi may be strategic, as this allows him to take on the mantle of the challenger. A role that Rahul is shying away from. Although I suspect it is a little beyond that. kejri knows that he can not win against Modi ; his goal is to damage him in enough seats and stop him from getting 272. Resulting in a deadlocked parliament. Who knows like Delhi embly kejri may get a shot at running India with cong support .Depending on how many seats Congress manages they can also form the government with kejri's support. Voting for kejri is same as voting for congress. Every voter must understand this.
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          Srinivasan Gopalarao
          Mar 10, 2014 at 12:54 am
          not bad but yet soft on the PM who presided over the decline of congress and frittered away the advantage we had vis a vis china bringing country to a standstill.
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          1. H
            Happy
            Mar 9, 2014 at 12:17 pm
            Good article. Sonia MMS did not presided over wasted decade but they made it. Sonia is no brain to rule the country but congress fooled Indians and now AAP learn the same technique of fooling Indians.
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              SHAHUL HAMEED
              Mar 9, 2014 at 4:16 am
              Insight analytical deep study appeared in this opinion-expressively indicates a timely need of thought,but how far it reach and touch the bottom level ethnic to below the richy living,unless and untill a sign of corroboration aim keeping thotality in one compion.what and how ever the chang on current trend we have to accept and be possessive apt,
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                Harish Kumar
                Mar 9, 2014 at 1:59 pm
                I am in complete agreement that Shri Kejriwal may not succeed in his high ambitions, but his targeting of Modi rather than Rahul indicates that he knows who is more likely to be his real rival if he wants to become prime minister himself. Or could there be other reasons? Could it be true that he is the Congress’s B-team? I am of the view that positively it is Congress B team.
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                  jodharora
                  Mar 9, 2014 at 5:28 pm
                  Tavleen ji, Thank God!. He blessed you chance to even with Sonia Ji. I hope she realizes that. How is he doing?
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                    M S
                    Mar 9, 2014 at 4:05 pm
                    A very good and well thought out article.
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                      KRA
                      Mar 10, 2014 at 2:46 am
                      I thought the BJP in Parliament were the original Congress' B-team. They loved and ped every single monstrous bill that the Congress proposed. So, could it be that AK the new C-team?
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                        Manohar Sharma
                        Mar 10, 2014 at 4:51 am
                        Arvind Kejriwal is a TOOL in the hands of the Congress Party against Narendra Modi as Jarnail Singh Bhindrawale was a Tool in the hands of the Congress Party against Akali Dal. Results we all know.
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                          Manohar Sharma
                          Mar 10, 2014 at 4:47 am
                          Beautiful article indeed. Arvind Kejriwal is no doubt a Puppet in the hands of the most corrupt and communal Congress Party. He is intentionally targeting Narendra Modi on the directions of the Congress Party to divert the attention of the public of the LOOT & SCAMS made by the Congress Party. Arvind Kejriwal is not an Aam Aadmi but a TRAITOR. "Modi Lao Desh Bachao, Congress Ko Bhagao."
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                            abhijit pal
                            Mar 9, 2014 at 4:15 pm
                            aap is PAAP for india.....liar kejri is most morally corrupt and dangerous for india
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                              Sachin Khandelwal
                              Mar 9, 2014 at 11:12 am
                              Transparancy in governance with a clear drive for progress and embracing modern technology is the key to unlock the doors of m welfare. Arvind Kejriwal represents the bureaucracy which has bound ordinary Indians in red tape. His ideas and views are anarchic and out of sync with modern developments. For example Jan Lok Pal is a huge supplemen to the already overwhelming bureaucratic layers of opaqueness in our adminstration. We need to peel off these layers by the employment of modern technology to bring tansparancy in decision making and minimal interference of government in development and welfare aspects.
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                                G
                                Mar 9, 2014 at 2:35 am
                                Seriously Tavleen?! We expect better from a respected journalist like you. " Or could there be other reasons? Could it be true that he is the Congress’s B-team?"I understand and respect your choice to want to see Modi as PM - I am going to vote for BJP too - but the above line is ridiculous and a seasoned respected journalist like yourself should know while slipping in that innuendo pugnaciously. More than anything else the credibility of hitherto well known journalists has been severely compromised in this election. I support BJP for very specific reasons and mainly because they have a better chance in steering our country than AAP . But please be objective and don't write for blind Modi bhakts if you don't want to compromise your integrity.But then you know that already.
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