Why the death in Dadri affects the national project under PM Narendra Modi

Lynching a person merely on suspicion is absolutely wrong, the antithesis of all that India stands for and all that Hinduism preaches.

Written by Tarun Vijay | Updated: October 2, 2015 12:57 pm
Dadri lynching, dadri killing, BJP, Dadri beef row, dadri man lynching, dadri beef man killing, beef ban, Mahesh Sharma, dadri beef ban lynching, dadri beef rumor killing, india news, nation news Relatives mourn the death of farmer Mohammad Akhlaq at his home in Bisara village on Wednesday. Villagers allegedly beat Akhlaq to death and severely injured his son upon hearing rumors that the family was eating beef. (Source: PTI Photo)

The daughter saw the bigger picture. She sounds like the mature one among all those who are grabbing this opportunity to dissolve this incident into the bigger issue and make it political. She has been asking us: Can her father be brought back if proved innocent? Being the father of a daughter, I can feel the pain in her eyes. Mohammad Akhlaq shouldn’t be dead.

Lynching a person merely on suspicion is absolutely wrong, the antithesis of all that India stands for and all that Hinduism preaches. Violence of this kind in a state like UP affects national goals. India is on the path to rediscovering itself through an all-inclusive development mission, whose success depends on how fairly we can make every Indian feel the confidence of being a co-traveller.

The buzz that Prime Minister Narendra Modi has created the world over needs a convergence of minds — no matter which party or ideology you belong to. Akhilesh Yadav is as much a part of this project as any other state leader. Better governance in his state helps this project; bad governance derails the principal objectives of our nation. Daughters are precious for this journey.

But I wonder why there was no outcry from the secular media and leaders when Tika Lal Taploo was killed by jihadis and his daughter was left alone in this world. The secular brand of communalism is more lethal sometimes than the bullets of violent people.

The violent reactions of the Dadri kind must remain an aberration. They raise a question for so-called liberal Muslims: Have you done anything to show Hindus that you stand with them when they are assaulted by the Andrabis? Muslim silence on Hindu woes is often taken as support for intolerant Islamists.
In many parts of India, cow slaughter is a serious offence. But it should be handled via the lawful path that the Constitution has provided us.

Sadly, secular celebrations of “beef festivals”, as well as the provocative butchering of a cow in a bazaar for political mileage, have pushed a society that worships the cow as mother to question the real motive of the seculars.

The Modi phenomenon has taken the world by surprise. The world is looking at India with awe and appreciation like never before. Should we allow emotive religious matters that concern our personal beliefs to derail what we have achieved through painstaking struggle? The UP government should take serious note of this.

In no society and in no era has extremism ever succeeded in providing an atmosphere for growth that encompasses the arts, education, agriculture, science, technology and, of course, poetry. Look at the fanatic regions in our neighbourhood. They have become barren lands, devoid of the flowering of any kind of creativity.

It’s a tribute to the collective efforts of our leaders from various parties and ideologies that we have been able to nurture the best human values in spite of severe challenges and obstacles. Before pointing fingers at others, we must ask why beef exports involve some of the richest and so-called high-caste Hindus. Most gaushalas are in bad shape, with the honourable exception of those model centres for cow protection run by VHP and RSS workers.

Thousands of cows are pushed into the slaughterhouses of Bangladesh every day. Cows can’t fly. And pray, do we feel the same pain or enthusiasm for correction when one of our daughters, a Dalit, a promising and honest deputy superintendent of police from Tamil Nadu, R. Vishnupriya, dies in mysterious circumstances? Have
you ever witnessed Parliament being stalled by honourable members to force a discussion on atrocities against Dalits? Should the “two-glass system” or the “two-crematorium system”, prevalent in many parts of the country, make us revolt?

Former RSS sarsanghchalak Balasaheb Deoras had said that if untouchability is not a sin, then nothing is a sin.The RSS has ceaselessly been working among Dalits to bring them to the mainstream of social and economic life through thousands of projects. Swami Dayanand Saraswati, Sri Sri Ravi Shankar, Gayatri Pariwar’s Pranav Pandya and the Swaminarayan sect have all spoken out against caste-based discrimination. Still, why don’t we feel enthused to practise what our acharyas have told us?

The writer is a Rajya Sabha MP and member, National Executive, BJP

(This article appeared first in the print edition under the headline ‘Death in Dadri’)