Cross-border Philanthropy

An Indian diplomat who offered to fund his alma mater in Lahore

Written by Khaled Ahmed | Updated: July 8, 2017 1:14 am
madanjeet singh, lahore government college, indian diplomat lahore, indian express editorial page, latest news, indian express Lahore’s Government College’s Vice Chancellor Khalid Aftab wanted to retain the institutional memory of the pre-Partition Ravians — as old GC students were called — who had moved to India.

Lahore recently saw the launch of Against all Odds, an account of Lahore’s Government College (GC) as it became a degree-awarding university in 2002. The author, the university’s iconic principal Vice-Chancellor Khalid Aftab, headed the institution from 1993 to 2011. Aftab’s career was a struggle against an ideological transition that was opposed to the values of the enlightenment he cherished. He also wanted to retain the institutional memory of the pre-Partition Ravians — as old GC students were called — who had moved to India.

Aftab reached out to old Ravian Khushwant Singh in Delhi, actor Dev Anand when he visited Lahore with Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee and recalled Balraj Sahni who came from Rawalpindi in 1930 to Lahore to study for BA but ended up editing the college magazine Ravi, apart from doing theatre with the great principal, Guru Dutt Sondhi, and actor-teacher Patras Bokhari. Aftab crossed over into Indian Punjab to invite old Ravians to an increasingly inward-looking and conservative Lahore. But the story he tells in detail is about Madanjeet Singh born in 1924 in Lahore.

Singh turned up at GC in 2004 and offered to fund the building of a dream: The Institute of South Asian Studies with a region-based faculty. He offered $120,000 as seed-money. Aftab found out that Singh was an ex-ambassador of India who was once made the goodwill ambassador of UNESCO. He was visiting his alma mater and the city he had loved. In Lahore, he had lived close to the tomb of Sufi saint Mian Mir whom Guru Arjan Dev, the fifth Guru of the Sikhs, had approached to grace the foundation-laying of the Golden Temple at Amritsar. Singh knew the family of poet Faiz Ahmad Faiz in Lahore.

He joined the Indian Foreign Service in 1953, serving in Italy, Yugoslavia, Greece, Laos, Sweden, Denmark, Spain, USSR and South Vietnam. In 1995, the UNESCO Executive Board created the biennial UNESCO-Madanjeet Singh Prize for the Promotion of Tolerance and Non-Violence. Abdul Sattar Edhi, Pakistan’s revered philanthropist and social worker, is one of its recipients.

In Lahore, VC Aftab took him around the university which looked transformed. “What have you done to my old gymnasium?”, Singh asked. On being told there was no money for restoration, he begged to be allowed to take on the job. Aftab asked the university syndicate which vetted the project enthusiastically. The money came through too. The Institute was planned tentatively to work under a SAARC faculty to discuss South Asian issues with internationally acknowledged scholars. The restoration of the gymnasium building was completed. But the final permission had to come from the government. This is where the VC got into trouble. He consulted a number of Old Ravians who could be persuasive with Islamabad. He tells what happened next: “Shamshad Ahmad Khan, former Foreign Secretary and Pakistan’s Permanent Representative at the UN, had some reservations on the future of the Institute. In his opinion, the university had to get clearance of the Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) before taking any further step in this matter. This was discouraging. I didn’t like the idea of going to a military establishment for clearance to start an academic project.”

The fate of the Institute of South Asian Studies was thus sealed. The idea of education under the British was different and the Ravian’s mind developed by it had become irrelevant after 1947. The trajectories followed by India and Pakistan condemned the minds of their people to abandon memories of living together peacefully. The gymnasium that Singh thought could bring the South Asian mind to think together still stands in the Government College University waiting for its students and faculty and the quarterly journal it was supposed to produce.

Singh was an extraordinary human being. He was a prolific author whose publications included Ajanta: Paintings of the Sacred and the Secular, Himalayan Art, The White Horse, The Oral and Intangible Heritage of South Asia, and Kashmiriyat. His ancestral house in Mian Mir Lahore was built-over long ago along with other historical sites. Singh passed away in 2013.

The writer is consulting editor, ‘Newsweek Pakistan’

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    Babu Gupta
    Jul 9, 2017 at 2:39 am
    So the diplomat was a typical muslim like the writer of this article with standard muslim mentality. Earn, eat and enjoy in India and support Porkistan. I wonder, this section of IE has become the place for psuedos, liberals and so called intellectuals to express their biased views openly and cheaply.
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      Ehsan Habib
      Jul 8, 2017 at 11:54 pm
      Oh for heaven's sake, Aryans too invaded the Sub continent destroyed the likes of Moenjodaro and Harapa. Dnt go into history yours very bloody. Still the Dalits are being cuted.
      Reply
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        Seshubabu Kilambi
        Jul 8, 2017 at 7:52 pm
        There are many people with grave illness in Pakistan...they may be alliwed treatment in india. Likewise, indians should be allowed in Pakistan. People to peopke contact can solce number of problems
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          Gopal
          Jul 8, 2017 at 4:31 pm
          Remember how Indian candle-wallahs lined up to support Imran Khan's charities. Today Imran Khan supports Taliban. He also does ISI bidding for destabilizing democracy. In other words, foolish Indians supported a Pakistani fascist. Just because a Pakistani talks about charity or education, you don't get rid of the bigotry that he has learned in his schools since childhood.
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            Tension
            Jul 8, 2017 at 8:54 pm
            Indian candlewallahs are p$imps for everyone. They know to drink , indulge in s.e.xx, cheat their life partners and beg to congis and left.
            Reply
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            VT
            Jul 8, 2017 at 2:37 pm
            "trajectories followed by India and Phakistan". Sir, please, this suicidal trajectory was vigorously taken by Phak not us - so put the blame squarely on phak. They identified themselves with their invaders while in fact they must identify with us. They also forgot they were victims of violence from the persian/turk/arab invaders and quite foolishly r toeing their invaders' line today.
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              Babloo
              Jul 8, 2017 at 6:18 pm
              So true. Muslims of south asia ( almost 100 converts ), have divorced themselves of everything that their ancestors stood for and embraced the islamic ideology from arabia which insultingly calls their ancestors idol-worshippers and non-believers and advocates hatred towards all non-muslims.
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            2. R
              Raman
              Jul 8, 2017 at 2:13 pm
              The contribution to LU by An old Ravian is not worth it! A money not well spent I dare say. LU is turned into theological seminary where tolerance is not preached and violence is encouraged. This Southasian ins ute in LU at some point will be hijacked by locals and converted into Muslim narrative as envisaged by mullahs and politicians associated with them.
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                Murthy
                Jul 8, 2017 at 11:03 am
                An example of how Muslims will distort pre-Islamic history... an Western University I came across a book with a strange le: "History of Ancient P.a.k-i-sthan". I thought, "How 'ancient' is Sthan?". It was an account of the Indus Valley Civilisation by a Sthani "historian" !! He had taken care to omit the photo of an important Indus Valley artifact......... The tablet of Shivji, with His Jatah, seated cross legged and eyes shut ( Yoginder holding the Universe in His Yog Maya) with the bull, deer, rhinosarus and possibly a snake, in the four corners - check it out on the animals, I am not sure abut the snake (!!) depicting Shivji as Pasupathi, the Lord of All Beings.... The Sthani Islamic author did not want his readers to know that they worshiped Shivji in "ancient" Sthan!!! Notice that most of our Pseudo-secular Columnists also suppress FACTS of history that goes against their ideology of Pseudoism.
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                  Babloo
                  Jul 8, 2017 at 9:56 am
                  The greatest untold story of history is the extermination of Hindus, Sikhs, Jains from Pakistan and Bangladesh since 1947 , which saw Hindu Sikh population in West Pakistan reduced to 1 from 22 , while in same period in India muslim population rise in India from 9 to 15 . Why ?? If we continue to deny facts and look the other way and do not recognize that muslim majority areas will always exterminate others, we Hindus have a bleak future. Remember, 1000 years ago, all of W Pakistan and Bangladesh was 100 Hindu, Jain, Buddhist. Today its almost 100 muslim.
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                    Babloo
                    Jul 8, 2017 at 9:57 am
                    Please read the numbers above as percent ( )
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                      Murthy
                      Jul 8, 2017 at 10:45 am
                      Babloo Brother, There are two aspects to the historical FACT you have mentioned on the 'ethnic cleansing' after 1947: One is the fear it creates in Hindhus and other Non-Muslims in India (Should I say, Non-Sunnis?) that once Muslims gain a higher density of population in areas of India, they would do the same here in INDIA. They are doing the same in Egypt, Iraq, Syria and Turkey, all of which have seen their non-Muslim per centage shrink.. Hence, the Hindu concern over increasing numbers of Muslims in India. Second, the impact of Islam on Non-Muslim Civilisations.. There were over 700 Hindhu Mandhirs in Sthan, from Peshawar and Quetta to Multan (Moolasthan, a Hindhu Pilgrimage Centre until the 16th Century), up to 500 Mandhirs in Kashmir... ALMOST ALL GONE NOW FOR EVER. My Punjabi friend used his British passport to visit his village in West Punjab. Said the Mandhir his ancestors worshipped in is now a Cattle Shed !! All the 200 year old paintings are there but defaced.
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