Fifth column: Another licence raj must end

It was this licence raj that prevented Kapil Sibal from allowing 1,500 new universities to be built.

Written by Tavleen Singh | Updated: July 6, 2014 8:28 am
Another question we do not ask is why no former Minister of Human Resource Development has ever managed to end the licence raj. Another question we do not ask is why no former Minister of Human Resource Development has ever managed to end the licence raj.

The most eloquent comment on the crisis in Indian higher education comes in the form of the long lines of anxious students outside colleges at this time of year. Students, who have worked hard to get marks in the nineties, fear they may not get admission to the colleges of their choice because there are ‘cut-off’ rates that can even be 100 per cent. The very idea of ‘cut-offs’ is peculiar to India, as are these queues outside colleges. But this is so normal for us that the media paid more attention to the ugly spat between the UGC (University Grants Commission) and the Vice-Chancellor of Delhi University.

The UGC should not have interfered in the university’s right to devise its own courses, but the academics, activists and political commentators who supported the Vice-Chancellor failed to ask why there should not be autonomy all the way down the line. They never asked why the licence quota raj that controls the building of more colleges and universities should not be ended. It is because nobody asks the right questions that standards of higher education are so low today that Indian universities and colleges never rank among the best in the world.

Another question we do not ask is why no former Minister of Human Resource Development has ever managed to end the licence raj. Why has it been allowed to breed corruption, poor standards of learning and education mafias? Since new colleges and universities are built by quota under the licence raj, it is usually senior political leaders who end up getting the licences. This enables them to grab expensive urban land in the name of building a college or an institute of technical training.

It was this licence raj that prevented Kapil Sibal from allowing 1,500 new universities to be built. The former HRD Minister told me in 2009 that India needed 1,500 new universities to be built urgently to cope with the rapidly increasing numbers of students who now choose to go to college. Ironically, those who do not manage to find admission in Indian colleges find it quite easy to find a place in foreign universities.

So it is not the lack of ability that cuts short their learning, but lack of opportunity. All this has happened in the name of making college education affordable for students from financially backward communities. In fact, what the leftist thinkers who control academia did was restrict learning and lower standards. The only solution now is to disband the UGC and its technical cousin, the AICTE (All India Council for Technical Education). People who run private technical colleges say that the powers of the AICTE to micromanage technical education are limitless. So technically, you can be fined for helping your son do his science homework.

The new Minister of HRD has the chance to do for higher education what Dr Manmohan Singh did for Indian industry in the Nineties: abolish the licence raj. When she makes her new education policy, she needs to begin by stating that she wants 1,500 new universities to be built over the next five years and anyone who wants to build them will need no licences. The UGC can be restricted to setting standards for accreditation. And, providing financial assistance to needy students instead of to institutions, as it currently does. Student loans and scholarships should become its main endeavour instead of interference in academic courses and salaries. Experts estimate that Indian universities face a shortage of more than 5 lakh faculty members and that one big reason for this is the low salaries on offer. So the best Indian professors prefer to teach in foreign universities.

The crisis in higher learning is so daunting that instead of worrying about Smriti Irani’s educational qualifications, what we should worry about is whether she has the guts to make a real difference. She has the choice of just tinkering as her predecessors have done, or of going down in history as a liberator. If she makes the second choice, she will need immense courage because of the vested interests lined up against her. What might help persuade her to dismantle the licence raj is if she keeps in mind that unless she does this, there is not the smallest chance of the Prime Minister’s dream of a shining new India coming true.

This dream can turn into a real nightmare, as the Prime Minister himself often points out, if the Indian economy is unable to create jobs for the 15 million young Indians who come into the workforce every year. These jobs can only be created if these young Indians are educated enough to be employable. How can they if we leave higher learning in the hands of officials whose main aim is to keep their own jobs safe by not letting go of quotas and licences?

Follow Tavleen Singh on Twitter @tavleen_singh

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  1. V
    Vishnu
    Jul 8, 2014 at 12:46 am
    Why not nationalise all the schools, colleges and universities? The free land had been provided to political sharks to make lakhs of crores like Patils and others. Students have shelved the capitation fee for education instead of a regular fee paying through their nose. I remember how I was black mailed to pay the capitation. As a honest government servant, it was not possible to pay such a huge amount without loosing my pension benefits.
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    1. A
      ashok dayal
      Jul 6, 2014 at 4:10 pm
      perfectly right.
      Reply
      1. B
        B.D.SINGH
        Jul 6, 2014 at 10:49 am
        A transparent policy should be evolved and any body who meets the prescribed standards should be allowed to run insution/university. But no transparent policies are made and so many things are left to discretion. Actually this discretion chapter should be closed so that if any body fulfills the prescribed condition and does not get affliction may go to courts. And this method may be applied in all sectors.
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        1. D
          Devendra Kodwani
          Jul 11, 2014 at 8:55 am
          Indian higher education is facing crisis. Unfortunately misaligned focus on establishing IIMs and IITs and absolutely grotesque annual round of admissions drama with 'cut offs' touching 100% have distorted the priorities. Could not agree more with suggestion to disband AICTE and UGC as licensing authorities. There is need for quality urance processes and professional body/bodies to enforce those processes.
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          1. D
            Devendra Kodwani
            Jul 6, 2014 at 5:29 pm
            good article
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            1. H
              Himanshu Gandhi
              Jul 6, 2014 at 7:47 pm
              I am more hopeful than most that concrete real changes will come about in the way education is being doled out through factories of degrees that have mushroomed and spread like wild fire, in past few decades....... not by dismantling the industry that primarily igns a label of "educated"...... but by invigorating a new one that focuses on imparting wide swath of skills through standardized regime that focuses on...1. making young work force ready for specific jobs in current industries, including semi-skilled service oriented independent pracioners in wide swath of areas.... 2. creating a knowledge infrastructure to support seeding and nurture of new industries, which have shied away from India for lack of good research base.... For, if we don't... then, we would have spent away critical opportunity to make real impact on global stage, and pilfered away biggest resource, that of young-ready-for- talent, that will go untapped... and that which will waver into m unrest.
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              1. H
                H K
                Jul 6, 2014 at 11:01 am
                Very imp. points raised, Immediate action to be taken, for India to have bright future.
                Reply
                1. A
                  Ajith Kumar
                  Jul 6, 2014 at 12:11 pm
                  Written in correct perspective.UGC like the Planning Commission has become tooBabu Oriented than pragmatic and endowed with great vision for the future of the children.Politics have been the result of endless games people in power and those we greedy play in tandem.If EGC has to be what it was meant to be the entire "club"has tobe disbanded and sincere and able educationinsts be appointed to the commission.Financing the students who want to pursue higher education is BETTER than financinghuge Bureaucratic rulers for catering to their egos
                  Reply
                  1. K
                    KRA
                    Jul 6, 2014 at 12:10 am
                    What a brilliant way to framing the issue! Kudos!The patient is terminally ill, time for serious action. Ms. Irani is bright, intelligent decisive, honest and smart. I am sure she will make a huge impact.
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                    1. M
                      Mohan Santhanam
                      Jul 7, 2014 at 6:47 am
                      Excellent and incisive article as usual, with the solution also given. Would the HRD minister have the courage to take this tough decisions against years of accepted vested interest that we've resigned ourselves to?
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                      1. P
                        Priyesh
                        Jul 6, 2014 at 10:57 am
                        good article madam. Being emplo in this field, I can tell you that the reason for the rot in this system arises due to the exhorbitantly high entry costs that anybody has to bear. naturally, somebody with a vision but no money is thrown out, while any halwai, builder, broker or a business man can set up a new insution
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                        1. A
                          acrutiapps
                          Jul 15, 2014 at 12:38 am
                          Indian government must shut down all its universities, fire all the education sector government employees. Sell off all real estate to anyone who is paying the highest possible price.I am not sure why Indian society has allowed government to control all the aspects of education, if people think education is important for their persona benefit they must figure out ways to educate themselves rather than simply letting government steal our hard earned money in the form of taxes and waste it on a education system which is far worth less.
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                          1. B
                            batra
                            Jul 6, 2014 at 7:25 am
                            Another great article. Does the PM have the courage to do it? (I suppose the HRD Minister will not do such things on her own)
                            Reply
                            1. H
                              harry
                              Jul 6, 2014 at 8:44 am
                              Brilliant article. Let people open the colleges and universities. Let people decide which university they will go to. Let the market decide which will survive and which will perish. Let the UGC decide the norms and publicly humiliate those who do not follow their norms. Nobody would like to invest money to make a loss and the standard will improve by sheer force.
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                              1. N
                                NLS
                                Jul 8, 2014 at 7:25 am
                                Yet another wonderful article, Tavleen. Well done! Even with all right noises that Modi govt. has been making on several matters, I do not see them bold enough to dismantle the license raj in education sector (I am not sure if Smriti Irani even has such a vision). Many of the govt. insutions instead of focussing on policy making and governance, are mired in administrative trivia with no focus on end goals. India can transform itself in 20 years, if education sector is opened up with strict standards laying and governance from the govt. and disbursal of credits / grants directly to the students instead of insutions.
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                                1. R
                                  Ragunathan
                                  Jul 6, 2014 at 4:47 pm
                                  Very Good article MAM.
                                  Reply
                                  1. V
                                    Vivek
                                    Jul 7, 2014 at 2:36 am
                                    There's a huge lobby who would resist to make this lisence raj go away..I hope the new minister has all the courage to take the bolder step towards faster growth and get applauded.
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