Tuesday, Nov 25, 2014

An emergency called Ebola

In communities and healthcare facilities, the knowledge of simple preventive measures, including hand hygiene and standard infection control precautions, is crucial to the national public health response. In communities and healthcare facilities, the knowledge of simple preventive measures, including hand hygiene and standard infection control precautions, is crucial to the national public health response.
Posted: August 20, 2014 3:40 am

The World Health Organisation has declared the current outbreak of the Ebola virus disease in some countries in West Africa as a public health emergency of international concern. The aim of this declaration is to contain existing outbreaks and prevent the further spread of Ebola through an internationally coordinated response. The declaration also serves as an international alert, so that countries can prepare for possible cases. It will help mobilise foreign aid and action to fight Ebola in affected countries. As of today, there are no cases of Ebola in the 11 countries of the WHO’s Southeast Asia region. This is the time to step up preparedness. A successful public health response will need strong health systems with sensitive surveillance, infection control and community mobilisation.

Since 1976, when the Ebola virus was first detected in Africa, it has been responsible for several outbreaks within a few African countries. The virus moves from its natural reservoir to humans through animals. Ebola is associated with high mortality, and no vaccine or cure is available at present.

The current outbreak of Ebola in the four West African countries of Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, has been ongoing for months. It has caused the highest number of cases and deaths and the widest geographical spread ever known for an Ebola outbreak. This complex outbreak involves multiple countries with a lot of cross-border movement among communities. The large number of cases in peri-urban and rural settings makes this one of the most challenging Ebola outbreaks ever.

Though the risk of the spread of this disease to countries outside Africa is currently assessed to be low, there is an urgent need to strengthen national capacities for its early detection, prompt management and rapid containment. The WHO believes that countries with strong health systems can quickly contain any imported cases using strict infection control measures.

While the global focus is on Ebola, we must not forget that several pathogens have and shall continue to threaten the world. Since the discovery of the Ebola virus in 1976, more than 30 new pathogens have been detected. SARS and H1N1 influenzea are two such pathogens that have caused pandemics in this millennium. Fortunately, both could be contained in a short period.

The International Health Regulations, IHR (2005), call upon countries to be transparent in sharing information on diseases that may have the potential to move across countries to facilitate an international response. IHR regulations also specify, among other capacities, the importance of surveillance, response, laboratories, human resources, risk communication and preparedness for early detection and prompt treatment.

The 2009 pandemic of H1N1 influenza demonstrated the importance of the IHR, as countries continued…

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