Who’s afraid of campus politics ?

Student movements are the cornerstone of a thriving democracy

Written by Parnal Chirmuley | Updated: March 18, 2017 9:12 am
ABVP, Ramjas college, Ramjas college clash, ABVP clash, Ramjas protest, Gurmehar Kaur, Ramjas college violence, campus politics, delhi university, Gurmehar Kaur, india news Paranjape blames the “left-liberal” media for what he thinks is a problem of perception, adding that the ABVP should emulate their “senior partners” (in crime, he forgets to say) and get themselves “effective envoys and image makers” at all levels. (Express Photo)

In his piece on the lessons the Ramjas College incident holds (IE, March 4), Makarand Paranjape makes a seemingly non-partisan plea for the restoration of academics to campuses. He calls student activists invited to speak at an academic seminar organised by the college’s literary society agent provocateurs, gives advice on public relations to the ABVP, and, what is more dangerous than his paternalistic tone will have you believe, concludes that campuses in the country need to be cleansed of progressive student politics.

First, he deliberately misleads the reader in saying that the student union in Ramjas College is led by AISA. It is not, it is an ABVP-led union. He then accuses Shehla Rashid and Umar Khalid, serious research scholars in their own right, of inciting student unrest all over the country, when they were not even present at the event. He sees their presence as a “red rag” at which the ABVP charges like “enraged bulls”, and suggests there is a “deeper pattern”, making it sound as if organising a seminar on Cultures of Dissent were something sinister. Wonder why an academic should think so badly of mere seminars! He does not ask why the ABVP unleashed violence upon all attending the seminar when the two weren’t even in attendance. He does not ask what it is about discussions on Bastar, Kashmir, women’s rights, Ambedkar, Bhagat Singh (and countless other seminars and discussions and film screenings on social issues that the ABVP is well known for violently disrupting) that “inflames” the ABVP into “making mistakes”. Even as he says they have “neither the time nor the intellectual inclination to do so”, he does not tell you that the politics of the ABVP stands in firm contradiction to democratic values, that they cannot organise seminars and discussions to present a different viewpoint, precisely because they are modelled on the paramilitary wings of fascist parties in Europe, whose primary function is to destroy democracy, with intimidation and brutal violence. Instead, forgetting his own deceptive intention of sounding like the kindly uncle remonstrating unruly children, Paranjape offers public relations advice to the ABVP. Yes, he has the freedom to do so, but as an academic, he is expected to demand intellectually motivated rigour from his mentees. This he fails to do.

He says the ABVP needs a “complete makeover”, with “smarter spokespersons and more female faces” making violence unleashed by the ABVP against innocent students merely a matter of public perception. But putting lip gloss on a Rottweiler does not make it a fluffy kitten. Professor Paranjape, how will it help the ABVP to have more “female faces”, when the organisation has consistently stood by its parent organisations in supporting violence against women and minorities? What will you say to Satender Awana of the ABVP who threatened Ved Kumari, dean of the law fin DU with “dire consequences” last year, or to those ABVP goons who dragged women students by their hair, called them prostitutes, hurled rocks at and beat them up as they peacefully protested the ABVP’s disruption of the seminar at Ramjas?

Equally worrisome is his all too familiar stance of victim blaming. Anyone who has followed the innumerable incidents of violence against women, for instance, will recognise this immediately. His assertion that “ultra-left, Ambedkarite or Kashmiri separatist factions always hope to create a wave of turbulence out of a whimper, a movement, if not a mountain out of a molehill”. This is disturbing precisely because, in one sentence, Paranjape writes off all the atrocities against Dalits and other lower caste groups, against women and minorities, and against the ordinary Kashmiri whose face bears the indelible marks of pellet guns. This daily mountain of brutality is for the professor a mere molehill. Sadly, the professor has also not spared a thought for our colleague Prasanta Chakravarty, who was nearly strangled, and kicked, and beaten by ABVP goons, and suffered grievous internal injuries.

Paranjape blames the “left-liberal” media for what he thinks is a problem of perception, adding that the ABVP should emulate their “senior partners” (in crime, he forgets to say) and get themselves “effective envoys and image makers” at all levels. Again, this is disingenuous, to say the least. The image makers of the present government, among others, have been the corporate media. Despite ample video footage in the Ramjas incident for instance, the media has chosen to call this a clash between two student groups. Several prominent news channels played Goebbels (Hitler’s propaganda minister) when JNU became the focus of the BJP last year, and carried out the mission of not only painting JNU, but all progressive institutions and debates in the country, as “anti-national”.

The most dangerous bit of Paranjape’s piece is his conclusion: That institutions of higher education should be cleansed of student activism. He quotes the case of the then Bombay University, which banned elections in 1992 following incidents of violence. He chooses to not mention, however, that through the new Maharashtra Public Universities Act of 2016, student union elections have been duly reinstated, and have been welcomed by a spectrum of organisations, including the ABVP. Here is why Paranjape’s conclusion is dangerous. He suggests that because the ABVP does not have the mettle to hold its ground with fair and democratic methods, then politics should be banned entirely from campuses, where students and teachers will not be allowed to express their opinions on burning social issues, even as vice-chancellors are allowed to join election road shows of the ruling party, and the RSS is allowed to hold shakhas on campuses, as has been amply illustrated by the current situation in BHU.

Further, Paranjape is advocating a purge of progressive student politics across campuses because it has gradually emerged as a counter to the criminalisation of student politics that was the legacy of some mainstream parties. Student activism has fought for democratic admission policies, for student rights on campuses, for the equitable right to education, and have consistently thwarted successive governments’ attempts at the blanket privatisation of higher education in the country. Brave student activists have built among students a deeper understanding of progressive people’s movements around issues of caste, gender, class, land, and minority rights. They have revitalised the idea of the university as a space for learning about commitment to one’s society, making education the first step towards creating a better society for all, as against protecting the privilege of a small elite. Viewed in that context, Paranjape’s piece is very far from being a defence of academics in the face of “party driven” politics.

The writer is associate professor, Centre of German Studies, JNU

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    Hemant Kumar
    Mar 18, 2017 at 2:39 am
    The likes of this writer are pocketing huge ry without doing any work. The govt is right in considering autonomy to universities. They are protesting. They have thrived/ fattened on tax players' hard earned money.
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      PPrasad78
      Mar 18, 2017 at 6:04 am
      No political protests should be allowed in campuses. Outside the campus there are several forums where issues can be raised and debated - but not within the campus !lt;br/gt;By the way , I think only Tax Payers should have the right to Protest !
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      1. K
        K SHESHU
        Mar 18, 2017 at 2:32 pm
        World' s great revolutionary movements started from campus with students - turned - politicians
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        1. V
          Vidhu
          Mar 18, 2017 at 5:33 am
          Leftists should not forget that they exist because of Right. Same way Right stops to exist no sooner Left gives in. lt;br/gt; lt;br/gt;Right is self financed. Left is a burden to Tax Payers. BHU provides talent for Industrial growth of nation.
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            Ajay G
            Mar 18, 2017 at 4:49 am
            RSS is made up of people who love this land. They can not tolerate any abuse of the local values. JNU has always challenged the traditional sets of thinking. lt;br/gt; lt;br/gt;Both are fine as long as they do not touch extremism. lt;br/gt; lt;br/gt;Name of JNU be changed to Netaji Subhash Chander Bose University. Or Shaheed Bhagat Singh University.
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              Ajay Sunder
              Mar 18, 2017 at 10:54 am
              It is not as if everything is wrong with JNU.One can understand the anxiety of the present dispensation to have its flag flying high but that alone is not a sufficient ground to criticise JNU.Let us look at the track record of JNU and find out about some of the best minds produced by JNU.
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                ak dev
                Mar 18, 2017 at 2:52 am
                Close JNU.
                Reply
                1. A
                  ak dev
                  Mar 18, 2017 at 11:49 am
                  Close JNU. It's good for nothing.
                  Reply
                  1. A
                    ak dev
                    Mar 18, 2017 at 11:02 pm
                    JNU is breading traitors.
                    Reply
                    1. A
                      Ansari
                      Mar 18, 2017 at 10:24 am
                      Islam had arrived in India in 9th Century and only because of liberalism in Hindu could stay here peacefully. lt;br/gt; lt;br/gt;Babar came 4 centuries later from Afghanistan. Afghanis were tribals who adapted to Islam. lt;br/gt; lt;br/gt;Islamic people first came from Saudi Arabia as traders on Malabars. Thanks to liberal local people they settled here.
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                        Ansari
                        Mar 18, 2017 at 10:17 am
                        Dear Friends !! Question here is not of Hinduism or Islam. It is about politics on Campus and Freedom for dissent in current scenario.
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                          anand
                          Mar 18, 2017 at 12:56 pm
                          The anti-national termites in the JNU both in faculty and among students shall be terminated.
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                          1. M
                            Moloy Aich
                            Mar 18, 2017 at 2:44 am
                            Very well said.
                            Reply
                            1. M
                              Moloy Aich
                              Mar 18, 2017 at 3:34 am
                              Is it a war between RSS v/s JNU !! To get the number 1 position ? Whose agenda is more divisive and anti-National .....
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                                BHAGWAT GOEL
                                Mar 18, 2017 at 3:01 am
                                ONE WOULD AGREE WITH YOU BUT TODAY UNIVERSITIES ARE INFILTRATED BY THOSE MANY OF THOSE SHOULD BE BEHIND BARS INCLUDING MANY PROFESSORS. DYING COMMUNISTS WITH THE HELP OF MAOISTS, SEPARATISTlt;br/gt;AND OUT RIGHT JAHADIS HAVE TURNED UNIVERSITIES PATICULARLY JNU, JADAVPUR AS CENTER FOR CREATING TURMOIL IN THE COUNTRIES. TIME HAS COME TO BAN COMMUNIST PARTIES AND THERE VIOLENT WINGS LIKE MAOISTS ETC.
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                                  Dan Mishra
                                  Mar 18, 2017 at 2:47 pm
                                  This is absolute nonsense and pure hubris. Students are supposed to study and discover. If they want to be Politicians, then they can wait to finish their studies and start serving people first, which will teach them the art and science of politics. Look at hi, Mandela, Modi and so on. I do not know of a single famous world leader who has been a student revolutionary except perhaps Communists who want nothing but chaos.
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                                    Desi
                                    Mar 18, 2017 at 3:41 am
                                    Some of the "students" and their leaders on campuses are well into their 30's. Would we accept regular agitations from workers of such age or younger? People of similar age groups should demonstrate similar socially responsible behaviour. Academics should mentor students towards this. Also our social science curricula give too much time to students to spend on non-academic activities.
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                                      Bajaj R
                                      Mar 18, 2017 at 3:55 am
                                      It is between 2 extremes Liberals and Conservatives (Nationalists). lt;br/gt; lt;br/gt;Extremists bring revolution or devastation. Turkey is going into hands of extremists (of opposite nature to liberals like Mustafa Kamal Attaturk). lt;br/gt; lt;br/gt;stan gave up Jinnah long back.
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                                        Bajaj R
                                        Mar 18, 2017 at 3:50 am
                                        Both are extremists.
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                                          Gopal
                                          Mar 18, 2017 at 2:57 am
                                          How does a mob pelting stones and protecting and acting in concert with men armed with automatic weapons become innocent? Only in the minds of JNU professors who have already decided that India is at fault.
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                                            Gurvinder
                                            Mar 18, 2017 at 8:45 am
                                            Foreign Secretary S Jaishankar and Deputy NSA (National Security Adviser) Arvind Gupta, both handpicked by Modi.
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