Thursday, Nov 27, 2014

A vote against Europe

An upswing in Euroscepticism has generally led to a higher vote for protest parties that have positioned themselves as anti-Brussels and as opposed to the European project. An upswing in Euroscepticism has generally led to a higher vote for protest parties that have positioned themselves as anti-Brussels and as opposed to the European project.
Written by Radha Kapoor Sharma | Posted: May 28, 2014 12:13 am | Updated: May 29, 2014 6:03 pm

Europe is now in post-mortem mode. Though Sunday’s European Parliament elections did not deliver a deathblow to the idea of Europe, they definitely sounded a warning knell. All over Europe, extremist, far-right or far-left parties have won the elections or made significant electoral gains. These are parties that, for the most part, contested on an anti-immigrant, anti-Euro, nationalistic, anti-EU platform. Or, in a most curious paradox, they want in to opt out.

The pan-European outcome is definitely a victory of the Euro-sceptics and the EU rejecters. And it does not get more blatantly anti-EU than the stand of the French front-runner, the National Front (FN). “Our people demand one type of politics: politics by the French, for the French, with the French. They don’t want to be led anymore from the outside, to submit to other laws,” said a jubilant Marine Le Pen, whose party secured 25 per cent of the vote, outstripping the governing centre-left Socialist Party and the centre-right UMP. Her party advocates a withdrawal from the Euro and Schengen zone, with tighter borders and a return to the “nation”.

Labelled a “political earthquake” by the French prime minister, the election results sent shock waves through France, with President François Hollande calling for an emergency meeting of the cabinet and attempting to reassure the French through a televised broadcast. Yet, the shifting faultlines of the French political landscape have been obvious ever since the FN garnered 46 per cent of the popular vote in a recent by-election and since the municipal elections in March, when they won 15 town halls. A country that voted the Socialists into power a mere two years ago is now beginning to veer to the far right.

The reasons for this electoral success are not hard to find. Under Marine Le Pen’s charismatic leadership, the FN has gone through a makeover and donned a softer, more acceptable mask. Le Pen has replaced the extreme racist, anti-Semitic diatribe that was the trademark of the party under her father, Jean-Marie Le Pen, with a more palatable (to some), though firmly anti-Islamist, anti-Roma and anti-immigrant, discourse. Her party has acquired new legitimacy in the eyes of many who were uncomfortable with its previous, even more extreme positions. Now, Jean-Marie Le Pen’s shocking remarks, like his recent pre-poll statement, “a deadly Ebola epidemic would solve the country’s problem with immigration”, do not seem to deter voters.

Moreover, the politics of fear that is deeply engrained in the FN’s DNA has been deftly exploited to create a climate of insecurity among France’s disaffected working class and unemployed youth. The blame for high unemployment and rising crime continued…

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