Monday, Nov 24, 2014
Since environmental issues are not part of mainstream political debates, there is no public opinion formed around the same, except a few scattered voices from select civil society organisations. Since environmental issues are not part of mainstream political debates, there is no public opinion formed around the same, except a few scattered voices from select civil society organisations.
Written by Shyam Singh | Posted: March 18, 2014 12:34 am | Updated: March 18, 2014 9:30 am

Ahead of the 2014 Lok Sabha elections, political parties are busy making promises and spelling out their visions, plans and blueprints for the development and governance of the country. Issues like employment, corruption, economic growth and inflation have generated considerable political debate. However, the environment has been given a miss. Delhi, the epicentre of the political debate, has also seen tremors hitting the city repeatedly in recent times. But the tremors or safeguards for them could not find a place in political discussions. There are several environmental issues that merit serious consideration ahead of the planning and governance processes. The country is facing a scarcity of various natural resources, including water, fuel, coal and gas, and is on the verge of becoming a victim of acute environmental problems.

Alternative sources of energy, such as nuclear energy, lack proper safeguards and have not been able to win the confidence of the people. The weather alert system in India lacks reliability and also the capacity to predict deadly incidents caused by nature, such as tsunamis, cyclones and tremors. The management of civic life is miserable. According to a study done by the Global Burden of Diseases 2013, one in three people in India lives in critically polluted areas and only two out of 180 cities monitored by the Central Pollution Control Board meet the criteria of low air pollution.

Pre-electoral debates, promises and competing visions of political parties shape a substantial part of the post-elections policy agenda of the party or a coalition in the government. The lack of environmental themes in pre-electoral debates causes continued neglect by the government of these concerns. Since environmental issues are not part of mainstream political debates, there is no public opinion formed around the same, except a few scattered voices from select civil society organisations. The lack of public opinion provides space for the government to walk away free, as it has no fear of losing a potential electoral support base. It is necessary to form public opinion around issues of environmental importance. Indeed, those organisations and people who have continuously been engaging with policy and governance on environmental issues should raise questions about the intentions of political parties that aspire to form the next government at the Centre. It is unfortunate to observe the silence from those organisations and people who were actively involved in raising environmental concerns at public platforms in the past.

Environmental governance has always been a low priority issue for governments, and therefore, the neglect of environmental challenges in mainstream political debates has been consistent. Several international agencies’ reports and research indicate that in the continued…

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