Short course: Preventable diseases killed 5 million kids in 2010: Study in Lancet

Preventable diseases like pneumonia,diarrhoea and malaria claimed the lives of nearly five million children younger than five in 2010

Written by Agencies | Published:May 12, 2012 12:15 am

Preventable diseases killed 5 million kids in 2010: Study in Lancet

Paris: Preventable diseases like pneumonia,diarrhoea and malaria claimed the lives of nearly five million children younger than five in 2010,said a paper in The Lancet medical journal. A total of 7.6 million children died in the first five years of their life,the authors said,and warned that the world was not on track to meet the Millennium Development Goal of reducing child mortality by two-thirds by 2015,“Two in every five deaths occurred within the first 28 days of life”. “Preterm birth is now the second leading cause of child death after pneumonia and is likely to become the top cause of death by 2015,” said the report. Five countries — India,Nigeria,Democratic Republic of Congo,Pakistan,and China — contributed to almost half the deaths of children younger than five. While child deaths have declined by about two million or 26 per cent since 2000,when the goal was set,this was not enough,the authors said.

‘Social jetlag’ may make you obese

London: Feeling tired and often spotted snoozing at your desk? Also piling on the pounds? You may have “social jetlag”,say German researchers. Social jetlag – a syndrome related to the mismatch between the body’s internal clock and the realities of our daily schedules – does more than make people sleepy,it also makes them obese,according to a team at University of Munich. “We have identified a syndrome in modern society that has not been recognised until recently. It concerns an increasing discrepancy between the daily timing of the physiological clock and the social clock. As a result of this social jetlag,people are chronically sleep-deprived,more likely to smoke and drink more alcohol and caffeine. Now,we show that social jetlag also contributes to obesity. “In modern society,we listen to those clocks ‘less and less due to the increasing discrepancy between what the body clock tells us and what the boss tells us,” said team leader Till Roenneberg.

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