Short course: ‘Dark chocolate reduces stroke risk’

A study likely to stir the souls of chocoholics has suggested that eating dark chocolate every day for 10 years could reduce the likelihood of heart attacks and strokes in some high-risk patients

Written by Agencies | Published: June 2, 2012 3:54 am

‘Dark chocolate reduces stroke risk’

LONDON: A study likely to stir the souls of chocoholics has suggested that eating dark chocolate every day for 10 years could reduce the likelihood of heart attacks and strokes in some high-risk patients. Researchers from Australia used a mathematical model to predict long-term health impact of daily dark chocolate consumption in people with a condition known as metabolic syndrome,which puts them at a high risk of heart disease. The team found that the treatment can avert 70 non-fatal and 15 fatal heart attacks per 10,000 people over 10 years. The researchers stressed the protective effects have only been shown for dark chocolate containing at least 60 to 70 percent cocoa,not for milk or white chocolate.

Delivery method may affect obesity risk

NEW YORK: Babies delivered by Caesarean section may have an increased risk of obesity by age 3,a new study has found. Among 1,255 women recruited in early pregnancy for the study,284 gave birth by Caesarean section. By age 3,15.7 per cent of those children were obese (with a body mass index in the 95th percentile or greater),compared with 7.5 per cent of those delivered vaginally. Mothers who delivered by Caesarean were on average heavier than those who delivered vaginally,and they breast-fed less. But after controlling for these and other maternal health and socioeconomic factors,the scientists found that Caesarean delivery was associated with a doubling of the odds of obesity in these children. Whether the Caesarean was planned or an emergency delivery made no difference.

Replacing fizzy drinks with water can lower diabetes risk

LONDON: Want to stay away from diabetes? Then,start drinking plain water instead of fizzy drinks and juices,as it could help stave off the metabolic disorder,scientists claim. However,adding water to a sugary beverage will not make any difference,according to the researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health. The researchers,who looked at the drinking habits of about 83,000 women for more than a decade,found that those who drank plain water instead of the sweetened beverages had seven to eight per cent reduced risk of developing diabetes.

For all the latest News Archive News, download Indian Express App

    Live Cricket Scores & Results