Punk Candy

After a four-year gap,the Californian group who made the white guy pretty fly are back with a new album,with the armchair philosopher name Days Go By.

Written by Shantanu David | Published: July 28, 2012 3:27:17 am

After a four-year gap,the Californian group who made the white guy pretty fly are back with a new album,with the armchair philosopher name Days Go By. The Offspring,comprising Dexter Holland (rhythm guitar,lead vocals),Noodles (lead guitar,backing vocals),Greg K (bass guitar,backing vocals) and Pete Parada (drums,percussion),is considered a mainstay of the present punk genre,and stick to their strength in their latest release.

While not extraordinary in any way (there are no ‘wow’ moments in the album),it is nicely arranged. Holland,who serves as the band’s primary lyricist and music composer,sticks to uncomplicated tunes and,for the most part,straightforward lyrics. This makes the album,despite it’s distinctly punk roots,universal,something akin to punk candy.

The first three songs in the album (The future is now,Secrets from the underground and the eponymous Days Go By) can best be characterised by the oxymoron “optimistic punk”. But Holland’s angst-ridden,yet somehow hopeful,lyrics and the upbeat music make the songs seem buoyant.

The band performs a few musical parodies with the tracks Cruising California (Bumpin’ in my trunk),OC Guns,I wanna secret family (With you). While the first not-so-subtly pokes fun at Katy Perry’s hit California gurls,the second is a satire of Orange County’s wannabe cabron culture. The third is well,the perspective of an immensely like-able jerk.

There are a few disappointing numbers as well,which seem out of place in a supposed punk album. Turning into you,Hurting as one,All I have left is you,are wistful (OK,whiney),and plumb the depths of love,broken relationships and other maudlin melodrama,and would be more fitting in adolescent albums.

One of the more unusual songs,and a favourite,is Dirty magic. While not a particularly complex melody,it employs a different bass and guitar line from the other tracks in the record.

The last song Slim Pickens does the right thing and rides the bomb to hell is a cheerful sign-off,a re-affirmation of the band’s multi-coloured spikes and leather blazers. It’s a peppy pre-apocalypse number,full of pop anarchist cultural references.

All in all,the album is a pretty faithful punk work,seasoned with a few goofball tracks and some unfortunate emotional influences. While not the band’s best effort,it is nonetheless a respectable addition to their discography.

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