below zero

Low-income pregnant women and new mothers with diabetes are nearly twice as likely as those without diabetes to be diagnosed with depression during and after pregnancy.....

Published:February 28, 2009 1:51 am

Low-income pregnant women and new mothers with diabetes are nearly twice as likely as those without diabetes to be diagnosed with depression during and after pregnancy. Depression during the last several months of pregnancy and the year following childbirth — the so-called perinatal period — affects at least 10 per cent to 12 per cent of new mothers,and approximately 2 per cent to 9 per cent of pregnancies are complicated by diabetes,the researchers from University of Minnesota,Minneapolis,noted in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

ZERO to 20

Childhood abuse damages genes

Researchers who looked at the brains of suicide victims said their findings have helped support theories that childhood abuse can alter the genes and cause lifelong damage. They found clear changes in the brains of people who were abused as children and who committed suicide in comparison to the brains of people who were not abused. This helps explain why childhood abuse,such as sexual abuse or neglect,can cause depression,other mental health effects and suicide,and could some day lead to treatments to help victims overcome their abusive childhoods,reported researchers from McGill University,Canada,in Nature Neuroscience.

20 to 50

Obese young men likely to die prematurely

People who were obese at the age of 18 are twice as likely to die prematurely compared to those who were normal-weight teenagers,reported researchers from Sweden’s Karolinska Institute in the British Medical Journal. They also found that men who had been overweight at 18 were one-third more likely to die prematurely compared to their normal-weight peers. Heavy smokers were twice as likely to have died prematurely,the researchers said. The study of 45,920 men over an average 38 years underlines the dangers of being overweight and the need to tackle a growing obesity epidemic. About 400 million people around the world are classified by as obese.

Above 50

Arthritic heart patients fear exercise

Patients with arthritis and heart disease may be afraid to get the exercise they need to improve their health. They may not realise that a little exercise will relieve both conditions,said a team at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its weekly report on death and disease. “Engaging in regular physical activity can help reduce arthritis pain and improve joint function,which in turn can help people with heart disease get more active and better manage both conditions,” said the organisation’s chief Dr Chad Helmick.

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