Clean-up marshals in Mumbai record over 77,000 offences in 2 months

In the past two months, statistics provided by the civic body indicate that the highest fine has been collected from Borivli West, totalling around Rs 21.81 lakh from 10,054, cases.

By: Express News Service | Mumbai | Published:September 5, 2016 12:54 am

SINCE the clean-up marshals returned to city roads two months ago, more than 77,000 people have been fined for various offences such as littering and creating nuisance, with the penalties collected touching Rs 1.68 crore. While citizens are charged for a variety of offences, spitting and littering on roads are the most common.

In the past two months, statistics provided by the civic body indicate that the highest fine has been collected from Borivli West, totalling around Rs 21.81 lakh from 10,054, cases followed by a collection of Rs 16.43 lakh from 7,965 cases in the Fort and adjoining areas.

The area around Grant Road and Kemps Corner has the lowest number of cases and the fine collected is just Rs 66,100.

Owing to allegations of extortion when the clean-up marshals were first introduced in the city, this time, the fines have been classified under denominations of Rs 100, Rs 200, Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 corresponding to a variety of offences.

For instance, littering on the roads, spitting, urinating, washing clothes or utensils in public can attract a fine of Rs 200. Washing vehicles or not delivering fish, poultry and meat waste in a segregated manner can earn a fine of Rs 1,000 while the fine for littering by pets has been fixed at Rs 500.

The fines are collected by around 30 clean up marshals in every ward except B, which is yet to have them over
police verification formalities.

In order to minimise the financial burden on the civic body, the one-year contract with the agencies states that 50 per cent of the collected fine will be submitted to the BMC while the remaining is the payment for the agency.

“We have collected a security deposit of Rs 1 lakh as well as another one-time deposit of Rs 1 lakh from each of the agencies. We have given them receipts worth Rs 2 lakh and we give them more when they run out. The agencies submit 50 per cent of the money to the BMC twice a week. This money is sent to the revenue department of the civic body,” said a civic official.

The official added that the clean-up marshals have helped spread awareness and discouraged people from littering.

Officials from the solid waste management department insisted that unlike the last time, the civic body has not received any complaint about clean-up marshals yet. “Complaints can be made to the ward offices, none of which have reported any grievances. However, we have made a provision for it in the contract according to which, in case a complaint is registered, the assistant engineer will conduct a hearing for the complainant,” said the official.

He added that the matter can be escalated to the assistant municipal commissioner followed by the deputy municipal commissioner, who will conduct the final hearing in the matter.