Duration of breastfeeding linked to fatty liver in adolescents: Study

The findings showed that babies who were fed on infant formula milk before completing six months of breastfeeding had a 40 percent increased likelihood of Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

By: IANS | Sydney | Published:June 12, 2017 6:15 pm
Breastfeeding, benefits of breastfeeding, pregnancy, health news, lifestyle news, indian express Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder affecting up to one in four adults. (Source: Thinkstock Images)

Babies breastfed for less than six months before starting on formula milk were more likely to develop liver disease as adolescents, according to a study. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common liver disorder affecting up to one in four adults. It occurs when fat accumulates within the liver cells in people who do not consume excessive alcohol and is commonly associated with obesity and insulin resistance.

The findings showed that babies who were fed on infant formula milk before completing six months of breastfeeding had a 40 per cent increased likelihood of NAFLD.

Further, children born to mothers who are obese at the start of pregnancy may be twice as likely to develop liver disease as adolescents.

“A healthy weight of the mother and support with initiation and persistence with breastfeeding may have later benefits for the liver in their children,” said lead researcher Oyekoya T Ayonrinde from the University of Western Australia.

“This provides additional reasons to support opportunities for women to breastfeed their infants for at least six months while delaying the start of infant formula milk,” Ayonrinde added.

Interestingly, children of mothers who smoked at the start of pregnancy also had a significantly increased risk of NAFLD.

For the study, detailed in the Journal of Hepatology, the team performed a liver ultrasound on more than 1,100 adolescents aged 17 years.

The study supports the need to encourage comprehensive healthy lifestyles before and during pregnancy and prolonged exclusive breastfeeding for the long-term health benefits of future generations, the researchers noted.

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  1. A
    Andy Kadir-Buxton
    Jul 8, 2017 at 11:52 am
    'Hands Free' ion , alternating tightening and relaxing of the l muscles for five minutes,is a simple method for increasing the quan y of breast milk produced. It can be done discretely, and can produce excess milk which can then be sold on to private hospitals who pay a premium for human milk. I got the concept in part from my g father's goats. When I milked them I noted that the more they enjoyed the experience the more milk they produced, and after being milked they were wide awake, their eye pupils were wide open, and they had a smile on their faces, which I later discovered were all signs of ual pleasure. Later, I read that scientists had discovered that mother who enjoyed breast feeding the most also produced the most milk, and I linked the two facts together. Once I had discovered 'Hands Free' ion it was just a matter of time before I met a woman who was having difficulty with breast feeding, as this is a common problem.
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