Destressing is as simple as turning off the email app on your phone

The emotional reactions we have to messages and the unwritten organisational email etiquette cause significant stress, as do the confusing blending of work and home life.

By: IANS | London | Updated: January 5, 2016 6:48 pm
e-mail, e-mail app, phone, e-mail pressure, work life, home life, managers, e-mail etiquette, communication, productivity, well-being “Our research shows that email is a double-edged sword. Whilst it can be a valuable communication tool, it is clear that it is a source of stress of frustration for many of us,” said the study’s lead author Richard MacKinnon. (Source: ibmphoto24 via Flickr)

If reducing stress is on your mind, turning off the email app on your phone can be an easy and inexpensive way to bring happiness back into your life, new research suggests.

Email can simultaneously be a great communication tool and a source of frustration and stress, the findings showed.

In a survey of around 2,000 people, London-based Future Work Centre found that people who automatically receive email on their devices are more likely to report higher levels of ’email pressure’, as are people who check email early in the morning or late at night.

“People who reported higher levels of email pressure also experienced greater interference between work and home — and home and work,” the report said.

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However, how much email pressure you feel and the extent to which it interferes with your work-life balance may depend on your personality.

“Our research shows that email is a double-edged sword. Whilst it can be a valuable communication tool, it is clear that it is a source of stress of frustration for many of us,” said lead author Richard MacKinnon — insight director at Future Work Centre — was quoted as saying by Daily Mail. “The people who reported it being most useful to them also reported the highest levels of email pressure,” MacKinnon noted.

Managers experience significantly higher levels of email pressure when compared to non-managers, the results of the survey showed.

“But the habits we develop, the emotional reactions we have to messages, and the unwritten organisational etiquette around email, all combine into a toxic source of stress which could be negatively impacting our productivity and well-being,” MacKinnon said.

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