A Conscious Effort: Sustainable fashion era; our pick of upcoming labels from LFW

Here are five labels from the Summer/Resort 2017 runway that caught our eye for their ingenuity and talent on Day Two

Written by Kimi Dangor | Updated: February 7, 2017 8:28 pm
Lakme fashion week, LFW 2017, LFW 2017, bollywood stars LFW 2017, LFW day 2, ,LFW 2 day, LFW 2017, fashion news, LFW 2017 photos Models wals the ramp with the collection of Naushad Ali during the LFW held at JIO garden ,BKC,Bandra. (Express photo by Kevin DSouza)

As Indian fashion’s romance with all things eco-friendly and organic intensifies, with every edition Lakme Fashion Week’s (LFW) dedicated Sustainable Fashion and Indian Textiles Day attempts to introduce young talent that is giving handloom fabrics and home-grown weaves a designer spin.

Here are five such labels from the Summer/Resort 2017 runway that caught our eye for their ingenuity and talent on Day Two:

DARK MATTER: National Institute of Design (Ahmedabad) batchmates Amit Vijaya and Richard Pandav presented their label Amrich’s spring-summer ’17 line ‘Chiaro-scuro’ inspired by the beauty of nature. The designer duo played on the idea of the dance of light and shadow and interpreted it employing their trademark Shibori dyeing skills. Clever use of Itajime Shibori (shape-resist dyeing) resulted in interesting linear and circular patterns in ombre gradations on silk dresses, khadi cotton tunics, maxi pinafores and off-shoulder dresses. Keeping the colour palette restricted to black and white made Amrich’s hand-crafted collection all the more impactful.

Models wals the ramp with the collection of Indigine during the LFW held at JIO garden ,BKC,Bandra. Express photo by Kevin DSouza, Mumbai 02-02-2017. Models wals the ramp with the collection of Indigine during the LFW held at JIO garden ,BKC,Bandra. (Express photo by Kevin DSouza)

SARI SOIREE: Auroville-based designer Naushad Ali experimented with the 5.5. metre sari and presented ‘A.Seam’ (boundless). The result was relaxed kaftans with tassel detailing, wrap-around pinafores, cowl drape maxis and one-sleeved sari drapes. The seamless flow of the outfits was intermittently interrupted by stripes and checks. And while the colour palette stuck to neutrals and pale earthy hues, it made the bright splash of a red off-shoulder kaftan seem all the more dramatic.

Models wals the ramp with the collection of Soham Dave during the LFW held at JIO garden ,BKC,Bandra. Express photo by Kevin DSouza, Mumbai 02-02-2017. Models wals the ramp with the collection of Soham Dave during the LFW held at JIO garden ,BKC,Bandra. (Express photo by Kevin DSouza)

IN A LINE: With a pattern graph that graduated from strong linear lines and pronounced checks and eventually dispersed into paint-like splashes and blurry splotches, designer Soham Dave talked about moving away from your pre-determined life path and finding your destiny. Through ‘Line/Line’ the Fashion Institute of Technology (New York) graduate presented his Ahmedabad-based label’s philosophy of simplicity and sustainability. Employing hand block-printing and brush and roller-painting techniques, handwoven fabrics were fashioned into boxy buttoned-up maxis, drop—waist dresses, roomy blouses and calf-length midis.

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FLORAL MOTIF: Serving up tradition with twist was Hyderabad-based designer Sailesh Singhania, who presented ‘Actuality of Consonance: Khadi’, a line of Jamdanis in bright colours. Each sari woven in the paper jamdani technique combined handspun khadi with real zari and carried motifs like the tree of life, playful squirrels, water cranes and cows seen in Pichhwai paintings. And while his styling left a lot to be desired and the wispy blouses looked incongruous with the drapes at times, there was no denying that Singhania’s attempt at lending a youthful flair to a weaving tradition was inspiring.

PATCHING UP: Inspired by Japanese Boro textiles, Jaya Bhatt and Ruchi Tripathi’s label Indigene presented ‘Modern Luxury’. Just as the Boro fabric traditional employs patchwork techniques, the designer duo used the “no waste” ideology and combined patches and panels of natural silk and cotton khadi and linen fabrics. Repurposed fabric was reinforced with thick hand stitches and fabric cuttings were used to add patterns, geometric patches, buttons and trims. We especially liked the kedia style tops and clamp-dyed dresses. Pic credit: Kevin Dsouza

(With inputs from Priyanka Sharma)

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