Just right for kids: Come back pea green

As Duncan, the owner of the said crayons, sits colouring one day, he gets a stack of postcards from an outspoken and indignant lot, demanding immediate rescue or release.

Written by Paromita Chakrabarti | Updated: November 5, 2016 2:36 am
The Day The Crayons Came Home, Drew Daywalt, Oliver Jeffers, Harper Collins, book review, indian express book review, indian express Daywalt and Jeffers’ sequel to The Day the Crayons Quit is a laugh-out-loud read.

Book: The Day The Crayons Came Home

Author: Drew Daywalt and Oliver Jeffers

Publication: Harper Collins

Pages: 40

Price: Rs 699

Appropriate for: 5+

What could be more fun than a bunch of crayons on strike because they don’t like their jobs? The answer lies in every mom’s clean-up nightmare: crayons left everywhere but in their box. As Duncan, the owner of the said crayons, sits colouring one day, he gets a stack of postcards from an outspoken and indignant lot, demanding immediate rescue or release.

There’s Maroon, forgotten on the sofa and broken into half; Pea Green, who wants to be known as Esteban the Magnificent, because who likes pea and who likes green? There’s directionally-challenged Neon Red, forgotten at Ritz Motel eight months ago. My favourite is the toddler crayon, who begs for a merciful release from Duncan’s brother (“Picasso said every child is an artist, but I dunno. I don’t think he met your brother”).

Daywalt and Jeffers’ sequel to The Day the Crayons Quit is a laugh-out-loud read. Not much needs to be said anew about Jeffers’ art. He usually plays a lone hand, working on his text and stories alone, but, here, Daywalt’s story is the perfect complement to his genius. It’s a collector’s item of a book, just like the previous book and most of Jeffers’ work.