Balamuralikrishna’s loss is irreplaceable: L Subramaniam

For Subramaniam, artistes like Balamuralikrishna happen once in a lifetime.

Written by Sonup Sahadevan | New Delhi | Published:November 22, 2016 9:34 pm
L Subramaniam termed M Balamuralikrishna's passing away as an irreplaceable loss to the nation and music fraternity. L Subramaniam termed M Balamuralikrishna’s passing away as an irreplaceable loss to the nation and music fraternity.

The music industry has been left bereaved after legendary carnatic vocalist M Balamuralikrishna passed away today. Reacting to the tragic news, eminent international violinist, L Subramaniam termed his passing away as an irreplaceable loss to the nation and music fraternity.

(See: Remembering legendary Carnatic musician M Balamuralikrishna: Rare and unseen photographs)

“He was a rare genius. A great singer, performer par excellence and amazing composer. I have had the privilege of knowing him since I was young. His voice clarity was so beautiful. It never deteriorated with age like in the case of many others. His performance was always like whiff of fresh air. His demise is a big loss. An irreplaceable one. ”

For Subramaniam, artistes like Balamuralikrishna happen once in a lifetime.

(Also read: M Balamuralikrishna, the spirit of Carnatic music)

“His kind of musician doesn’t come often. He elevated music to a new level with his creativity and genius. He was one of those few musicians who had mastered the instrument called viola. It’s a great loss for the nation. He was certainly a Bharat Ratna material and he will always be remembered as a legend who was part of the golden period of Indian music along Semmangudi Srinivasa Iyer, M.S. Subbulakshmi,” said Subramaniam.

Balamuralikrishna passed away earlier today after a brief illness. The legend was 86 when he breathed his last. Among the many honours awarded to him, sitting right at top is nation’s second highest civilian honour Padma Vibhushan. The French government also awarded him with the prestigious Ordre des Arts et des Lettres in 2005.