Netaji’s elder brother sought Japan help to raise ‘army of 50,000’ against British: files

Dated September 18, 1941, the letter was intercepted by intelligence agents and is among a set of detailed correspondence between the Japanese consulate in Kolkata and the Bose family.

By: Express News Service | Kolkata | Updated: September 21, 2015 1:45 am
netaji files, netaji subhas chnadra bose, subhash chandra bose, West bengal netaji file, mamata banerjee, netaji snooping, netaji death mystery, spying on netaji kin, india news, latest news, top stories Another report, dated April 15, 1942, said that “even the Congress circles are satisfied that Sarat Bose had Japanese connections and that government was probably justified (in) putting him in jail”.

Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose’s elder brother Sarat Chandra Bose had allegedly planned an armed attack against the British in 1941. He also wanted to raise an army of 50,000 with the help of Japan —- aligned with Germany and a part of the Axis powers fighting the British-led Allied forces in World War II.

The plan was outlined by Sarat Chandra himself in a letter that had been written to “Mr Ohta, Chancellor of the Japanese Consulate” in Kolkata.

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“We have 10,000 men ready to immediately take up arms. We can raise the number of 50,000 within a few months of getting the money and the arms we want. Please let me know when we may expect the arms we want and if you can arrange for the money we want through any other channel. This is very important and very urgent,” the letter said.

Dated September 18, 1941, the letter was intercepted by intelligence agents and is among a set of detailed correspondence between the Japanese consulate in Kolkata and the Bose family.

Another report, dated April 15, 1942, said that “even the Congress circles are satisfied that Sarat Bose had Japanese connections and that government was probably justified (in) putting him in jail”.

Dr Ashit Mukherji, the then editor of Eastern Economist, was believed by intelligence agents to be “acting as a go-between for the Japanese Consulate and the Bose family”. A report notes that the Indian National Army lacked “financial strength and it was therefore again in accordance with the instructions of Subhas Bose that they desired to make contact with the Japanese Consulate”.

The British intelligence agents also believed that Dr Kani Ganguly, a “first friend” of Netaji had contacted “with Nazis in Germany and Calcutta” and had conceived the idea of installing a “broadcasting station under the patronage of the Nazis ostensibly for the purpose of broadcasting anti-British to India”.

The report, concerning Ganguly, also noted that “The activities of these stations…will grow bitter with the success of Japanese progress in India”.

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