Tallest Tricolour hits rough weather in Attari, replaced twice in two weeks

The flag is illuminated by LED lights from three poles, each 65-ft high; and, the entire project has cost the state government about Rs 3.5 crore, so far.

Written by Navjeevan Gopal | Chandigarh | Published:March 25, 2017 5:39 am
tricolor, tallest tricolor, attari border, Amritsar Improvement Trust, country's tallest tricolor, india news, latest news New panel formed by government will decide on next step

The country’s tallest Tricolour, flying at 355 feet from the ground at Attari near the border with Pakistan, has run into rough weather. Costing Rs 1 lakh a piece, the 120 ft-by-80 ft flag — weighing 125 kg and including a 5-ft base — has been replaced twice since it was hoisted for the first time on March 5 after its fabric was damaged by strong winds.

With only 12 standby flags available with the Amritsar Improvement Trust, which is in charge of the installation, among the solutions being discussed are hoisting the flag only on special occasions or using parachute fabric entirely that costs nearly Rs 4 lakh and comes with a three-month guarantee. The current flag has parachute material stitched to the cloth at vulnerable areas, on the outer sides.

Officials said that the next step would be discussed soon by a committee recently formed by the Punjab government for the maintenance of the flag, and comprising officials of the Trust and district administration.

“If we have to replace five flags in a month, it would translate into 60 flags a year. This would mean that more than Rs 60 lakh would be required annually to keep the flag hoisted. I have proposed that the flag be hoisted on special occasions like Independence Day, Republic Day and festivals like Holi and Diwali. The issue will be discussed during the meeting of the newly formed committee,” Rajeev Sekhri, superintending engineer, Amritsar Improvement Trust, told The Indian Express.

“Since this is the tallest flying Tricolour, there was no study conducted on how it would withstand the weather at such a height. We are now planning to try a flag made fully of parachute material. We have had discussions with a manufacturer already. A flag made fully of parachute fabric will cost nearly Rs 4 lakh… it comes with a guarantee of merely three months. But still, it is worth a try,” said Kamal Kohli, whose Hoshiarpur-based firm Bharat Electricals set up the infrastructure for the Tricolour.

The flag is illuminated by LED lights from three poles, each 65-ft high; and, the entire project has cost the state government about Rs 3.5 crore, so far.

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  1. O
    Onkar Singh
    Mar 25, 2017 at 3:44 am
    What purpose does a flag weighing 125 kg flying at 100ft and above when the Parliament and the state emblies are filled with criminals,and the top business houses cheat the country of lakhs of crores by way of money laundering ,evasion of taxes and numerous other dubious means,and we have corrupt politicians,babus,judges,police officers,and crores of people living below poverty line?A national flag represents the pride and sacrifice of the country.But does the reality in the society really reflects those characteristics of the flag?No.So why have double standards? While the society in reality is rotten from inside,what purpose is served by flying the flag so high? Unless we want to live under a illusion that we are a great nation of the corrupt and the poor and that's what the flag represents.So the values of a good egalitarian, democratic and a just society gets undermined.Lets have country in which the people get enough food to eat,get a minimum standards of education,a reasonably priced healthcare and a criminal free legislators,a less corrupt politicians and Babu's, even if fly the National flag at a lesser height and of lesser weight.Build a country of less strife and more goodwill.Less of fake and pseudo nationalism of the present rulers of the day of this country.
    Reply
    1. A
      Adri
      Mar 25, 2017 at 5:43 am
      ole Parikar is fit for nothing!
      Reply
      1. K
        Kay Singh
        Mar 25, 2017 at 4:32 am
        Typical way of doing things. No study; just execute a project basedon on the whim and fancy if some silly politician who is looking at the w thing from the angle of how it will benefit him.
        Reply
        1. C
          ckm
          Mar 25, 2017 at 1:20 am
          Obviously some contractor made money; how does this help the common man?
          Reply
          1. A
            Antony
            Mar 25, 2017 at 6:27 am
            The flag must be of special design with small pores on the cloth to allow the wind to p through it.
            Reply
            1. J
              Joydeep
              Mar 25, 2017 at 1:44 am
              Mitron. Let us declare the wind anti-national and send it to stan
              Reply
              1. I
                Iqbal
                Mar 25, 2017 at 4:16 am
                Hang three langotis on rest of the day
                Reply
                1. S
                  Sankaran Krishnan
                  Mar 25, 2017 at 7:00 am
                  Instead it is better to utilise the materials that withstand all Weather condition and now it is not good to stop hoisting the flags after all fanfare with which it was advertised and if done on special occasions, it is not acceptable to the Indian Nationals. Hope the parae materials are used to sch the Tri-colour and let it fly high !!!
                  Reply
                  1. K
                    KSRao
                    Mar 25, 2017 at 2:41 am
                    Could not they ask some aeronautics people to suggest whether the fabric can withstand the winds at that height or suggest some material that withstands?
                    Reply
                    1. N
                      Nitish
                      Mar 25, 2017 at 4:36 am
                      Installing taller abd bigger flags across the country and spending on their illumination is a waste of money without any purpose. When you have many people struggling to get their meal of the day and bigger flags are installed, it doesn't sound ethical and practical.
                      Reply
                      1. N
                        Nishant
                        Mar 25, 2017 at 5:08 am
                        Parae fabric is just one kind of special weave. The in charge people should CALL THE CARDURA company, as they pioneered special rip stop fabrics with a variety of weaves. People with knowledge (could be military uniform selectors) would know the right combination of weight and strength, or just try different weaves and thicknesses to empirically find out which one would last the longest in rough winds. Be prepared to lower the flag, or have it done automatically once the wind speed is higher than a certain limit.
                        Reply
                        1. R
                          Rahul
                          Mar 25, 2017 at 4:16 am
                          You are now ping wind in the comments section...
                          Reply
                          1. O
                            Observer
                            Mar 25, 2017 at 4:08 am
                            I had already sounded on the above possibility of the flag getting torn periodically due to high velocity winds and the need to have reasonable inventory of flags of reqd.cloth quality. . These apprehensions have come true reg.Attari national flag also, as was the case with some other high flying flags in our country. The think tank now should include a veteran textile technologist also so that these flags maintenance/replacement issues could be deliberated at length at the very earliest, for a lasting solution to the problem. Interesting to note that the suppliers are giving three months warranty only. Any novel idea sold has also its maintenance/replacement issues and all these matters also supposed to be thoroughly thought through at least henceforthcluding the height, weight, supply time, maintenance factors of the flag.
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