Six new AIIMS struggle to fill up posts, look at retired professors

Elaborating on the proposal to hire retired professors on contract as faculty, a Health Ministry official said, “That way we may get good, competent people who have retired from institutes like AIIMS-New Delhi, and PGI-Chandigarh.”

Written by Abantika Ghosh | New Delhi | Published:July 5, 2017 5:42 am
AIIMS, Zika virus, Delhi Zika virus, India news, National news, latest news, India news, National news, Rains and diseases in Delhi, All India Institute Medical Sciences Each AIIMS received 600-800 applications on an average last year, which means only one in 14 applicants was found to be deserving and only two of three who were selected joined. (Representational)

THE SIX new AIIMS are struggling to fill vacancies, with the Union Health Ministry not too hopeful about getting the right candidates for the 1,285 posts this year. One proposal being considered now is to hire retired professors up to the age of 70 years on contract as faculty. Last year, a total of 1,300 posts were advertised for the AIIMS at Bhopal, Bhubaneswar, Jodhpur, Patna, Raipur and Rishikesh. Only 300 were selected and just 200 finally joined. At his annual press conference last month, Health Minister J P Nadda admitted, “We are not getting good people. Hum chalis-chalis logon ko reject kar rahen hain (We are rejecting up to 40 people at a time).”

Each AIIMS received 600-800 applications on an average last year, which means only one in 14 applicants was found to be deserving and only two of three who were selected joined. The number of vacancies this year is only a little lesser. Bhopal has advertised 251 posts, Bhubaneswar 178, Jodhpur 204, Patna 253, Raipur 204 and Rishikesh 205. A total of 305 posts are sanctioned in each AIIMS, and the number of posts filled ranges from 55 in Patna, to 135 in Bhubaneswar.

Officials associated with the recruitment process at the Union Health Ministry and at the new AIIMS say the problems in getting qualified faculty are manifold. While the substantially higher salary structures in the private sector for specialities such as nuclear medicine and neurosurgery is one factor, making recruitment for senior posts like professor and additional professor extremely difficult, the other is the lack of facilities in the smaller centres where the new AIIMS have come up.

Elaborating on the proposal to hire retired professors on contract as faculty, a Health Ministry official said, “That way we may get good, competent people who have retired from institutes like AIIMS-New Delhi, and PGI-Chandigarh.”

While a professor at an AIIMS would get around Rs 2.12 lakh monthly salary including HRA, an additional professor is entitled to around Rs 1.91 lakh. In the private sector, depending on a doctor’s discipline and the demand for it, he or she can earn up to Rs 7-8 lakh, said the director of one of the six AIIMS.

Last year, AIIMS-Jodhpur advertised 200 posts, got 700-800 applications, and found only 70-odd good enough to hire, said Director Dr Sanjeev Misra. This year, for 220 posts, the institute has received a thousand applications and some 80-odd may finally be recruited.

“The response is very good, but we are clear we do not want to compromise on quality. That is why the selection process is stringent. We are looking for excellence in teaching and research because if we do not set standards high, it will become like any other medical college. Institution-building takes time, even AIIMS-Delhi took 60 years to reach its present standards,” Dr Misra said.

AIIMS-Bhubaneswar, with 135 of 305 faculty posts filled, is the best placed among the new institutes. Director Dr Gitanjali Batmanabane believes it is because people from Odisha want to go back there to serve it.

“It is more difficult to get faculty in disciplines that are in demand in the private sector, but our position is relatively better because people are keen to work for the state. I am hopeful of reaching 960 beds by the end of the year,” she said.

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  1. P
    PGIDOC
    Jul 12, 2017 at 11:35 am
    I APPLIED FOR ONE FAULTY POST IN ONE AIIMS IN ONE YEAR (2014) , INTERVIEW WAS CALLED IN AFTER 2 YEARS (2016) AND THEN AFTER 1 YEAR (2017) NOTICE CAME RESULT INTERVIEW STAND CANCELLED . ONE OTHER AIIMS HAD ADVERTISED FACULTY POSITIONS THRICE BUT FAIL TO CONDUCT INTERVIEWS TILL DATE SAD TO KNOW YOUNG FACULTY IS BLAMED FOR INCOMPETENCY ALWAYS . TO SHOW OUR COMPETENCY YOU NEED TO GIVE US CHANCE TO SERVE
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      Dr. Ankur Gupta
      Jul 8, 2017 at 11:22 pm
      It was expected. How do expect doctors to shift their base to these small cities with poor ries and pathetic services.
      Reply
      1. A
        AIIMS PATNA
        Jul 6, 2017 at 9:33 pm
        till date health minister showed his inefficiency to complete the recruitment process which started thrice in AIIMS PATNA. and he is telling media about the scarcity of appropriate candidate for the posts. they are trying to save there skin by suggesting options of recruiting retired persons. they should again come to basics. why a person retires from a post. sorry to say about.
        Reply
        1. R
          Rameswar Pattanayak
          Jul 6, 2017 at 6:09 am
          Shortage of doctors . The position is alarming across the country. It is high time to introduce B.Sc(Medicine). This 3 yr course should act as a bridge to MBBS. The numbers of seats should be in thousands in every state. They should replace quacks in rural India. After 3 yr practice they can pursue a 2 yr course to complete MBBS. This may reduce doctor shortage.
          Reply
          1. A
            AIIMS DOCTOR
            Jul 5, 2017 at 8:51 pm
            I am assistant professor in AIIMS Delhi, and Wanted to Join Patna AIIMS to Serve my State, Please help let me know the process, I have applied to the open post in patna AIIMS, but first time the Interview was Cancelled Due to some corruption charges on patna AIIMS, And Second time i have been waiting from last 8 months after applying no interview had taken place yet. i would like to request the Govt to please be active and stop frustrating process
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            1. F
              Frustrated Medico
              Jul 5, 2017 at 6:35 pm
              This is one of the biggest scams in government medical colleges in India. Did not get deserving candidates? That's a mockery of our hard work and the greatest lie being propagated by Medical colleges in North India in general and AIIMS in particular. None of the teaching faculty joining aiims is a world authority in their fields. Its a lie to create an artificial scarcity, to take money in the millions and give the posts to "known" people. And the myth the administration propagates in the media is they didn't get deserving candidates! Its a depressing slap in the face of young, energetic, hard working doctors. So many talented doctors get initiated into the murky, corrupt underbelly of govt. babus sitting in AIIMS and the like. We are demoralised, and our creativity and hunger for knowledge is nipped the bud. This is how nepotism and corruption ensure that medical students don't get the teachers they deserve, patients don't get the doctors they deserve and no research happens.
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                Dr. Prashun Guha
                Jul 5, 2017 at 3:49 pm
                One more reason for AIIMS Bhubaneswar doing well is because the average quality of doctors passing out from the medical colleges of Odisha is better than most other states.
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                1. V
                  veto
                  Jul 5, 2017 at 5:05 pm
                  What rubbish!
                  Reply
                  1. F
                    Frustrated Medico
                    Jul 5, 2017 at 6:49 pm
                    And what tells you that? I'd rather think that's because probably there is less nepotism there. It's a all a big lie to justify keeping posts vacant and say that no deserving doctor passes out these days. It's always easier for the media and public to digest when the blame is passed onto the applying young doctors themselves, who are anyways too harrassed to raise their voices against the opaque selection processes.
                    Reply
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