Saturday, Dec 20, 2014

With skill and fairness towards all

He handled the most difficult of cases for the government and maintained a thorough resolution-oriented approach. It was nothing less than statesmanship.  Source PTI He handled the most difficult of cases for the government and maintained a thorough resolution-oriented approach. It was nothing less than statesmanship. Source PTI
Written by Vivek Krishna Tankha | Posted: September 4, 2014 12:17 am | Updated: September 4, 2014 6:03 am

Vahanvati was the counsel for government in what was probably the most difficult time for any government before the Supreme Court.

How do you write a reminiscence of a great lawyer friend upon his untimely death, when he was more lively than almost all of his contemporaries and larger-than-life in his grace, etiquette and court mannerisms? How do you remember a soul who meant ill of none, who was poised and calm in the most difficult of matters to defend, and who remained so throughout his life?

How do you not weep in your heart, but not help a smile, thinking of the man who lived the “If” of Rudyard Kipling, where it reads: If you can keep your head when all about you,/ Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,/ If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,/ But make allowance for their doubting too.

Goolam was the former attorney general, former solicitor general and former advocate general of Maharashtra, but ask me and I will unhesitatingly say, Goolam was more “general” than anything else. Ask the students of the National Law Institute University, Bhopal, who were charmed by what was probably his last public speech during the valedictory of a moot court earlier this year, or junior counsels who got to work with him, and they will readily tell you that Goolam was a man who never lost the common touch.

Goolam made his way up through ardent struggle and with the sheer dint of enterprise more than anything else. He was a hard-worker — sharing briefs with him as an additional solicitor general while he was attorney general, I could see how meticulous his notes were, and how well prepared he would appear. He was a man of fine detail and a lawyer of great industry. For example, in Chief Justice S.H. Kapadia’s court, even in “covered” income tax matters he would have the tax effect, the assessment year and the nature of exemption claimed or type of work done by the assessee on his fingertips; no matter if he had over 25 briefs a day.

While my association with Goolam was rather short, the deep loss from his untimely demise makes me feel as if I had known him my entire life. Curiously, we were advocate generals almost for a coinciding period and moved to the Supreme Court almost at the same time. I, however, had first met him at the Bombay High Court when, as the advocate general of Madhya Pradesh, I had to defend some very high-stake property disputes on behalf of the state of MP. In our search for a fine counsel, we probably chose one continued…

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