Friday, Sep 19, 2014

Pakistan bike-snatchers turned terrorists for IM’s ‘jihad lite’

Until two months back, they were ordinary bike-snatchers. Now, they are in an Indian jail in connection with terrorism charges. (PTI) Until two months back, they were ordinary bike-snatchers. Now, they are in an Indian jail in connection with terrorism charges. (PTI)
Written by Pranab Dhal Samanta | New Delhi | Posted: April 6, 2014 1:26 am | Updated: April 6, 2014 9:08 am

You have to go to India, Uttar Pradesh, via Nepal. There you have to target Indian forces. A local friend will help you. It will take you two hours. And then you return the same way you got there. You will get weapons there and you leave them behind after the work — instructions of Daniyal, later identified as Indian Mujahideen founder Riyaz Bhatkal, to the two Pakistani terrorists nabbed in Gorakhpur on March 28.

Meet Abdul Waleed Rind and Fahim alias Owais from Manghopir area of Karachi — two soldiers of the new, low-cost jihad being waged against India from Pakistan. Until two months back, they were ordinary bike-snatchers. Now, they are in an Indian jail, disconnected from their handler Daniyal-bhai, whom they came to know more as loveroldy@nimbuzz.

The two have since been shown Riyaz’s photograph and confirmed him to be Daniyal, also codenamed Tausif.

Theirs is a story of two school dropouts who aspired to become jihadis, and borrowed money from friends to find their way to an Afghan Taliban training camp for a crash-course of sorts where they only learnt basic handling of an AK-47 and a pistol without actually firing one. For three years after that, they did odd jobs and snatched bikes until their gang leader Abdullah put them on to Daniyal — as recently as February 2014.

Daniyal just needed to get one of them acquainted with using the Internet on a cellphone so he could send instructions through apps such as Nimbuzz and deliver them to an attack site using his IM network, again cultivated through social media sites, in India. The plan had worked earlier as well. But this time, Indian agencies had a mole amid them and that meant Fahim and Waleed had little chance once they entered India.

Waleed had joined a madrasa in Manghopir, Bait-ul-Uloom, three years after dropping out of a government school. A fellow Iranian
student Umair was his first jihad tutor. They became friends and a year later, set off to the Af-Pak border to try and get some “training”.

Waleed even sold his Chinese-made mobile phone for Rs 1,000 to undertake this trip.

At Baramcha, they found bikers roaming about – one of them came and asked “training” and Umair responded “training Kazam”. The man returned with two more motorcycle riders to take them into the hills to a place with mud hutments.

Faheem’s story is similar.

He took to playing football for a local club Manghopir National after leaving school. Came to know Nayeem, who turned out to be his tutor and even helped raise Rs 2,500-3,000 for them to go to the Afghan border.

It was the same route Waleed would take a few months later via Quetta. They too met continued…

comments powered by Disqus
Featured ad: Discount Shopping
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 952 other followers