Nuclear deal: India to ratify additional protocol to Indian specific safeguard agreement

The commitment to ratify the agreement was given to grant greater ease to IAEA to monitor India's civilian atomic programme.

By: Press Trust of India | New Delhi | Updated: June 23, 2014 10:47 pm
Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (Source: PTI) The ratification is a signal by the Narendra Modi government to the world, particularly the US, that it is serious in continuing to implement the Indo-US nuclear deal

India on Monday said its decision to ratify the additional protocol to Indian specific safeguard agreement was a “signal” that the country will abide by its international obligations.

“Let me confirm to you that the government has decided to ratify the additional protocol to Indian specific safeguard agreement. We had signed this earlier, what we have decided is to take next step of ratification. This is a signal of our commitment to abide by our international obligations,” the Spokesperson in the External Affairs Ministry said.

The commitment to ratify the agreement was given under Indo-US nuclear deal by the previous dispensation to grant greater ease to IAEA to monitor India’s civilian atomic programme. The additional protocol was ratified last week and this has been conveyed to the Vienna-based IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency), the global watchdog of nuclear activities.

The IAEA had in March 2009 approved an additional protocol to India’s safeguards agreement consequent to a pact reached with the agency the previous year to place its civilian nuclear facilities under IAEA safeguards.

That agreement had paved the way for the 45-member Nuclear Suppliers Group (NSG) to grant India-specific waiver for it to have commercial relations with other countries in the civilian atomic field. The waiver was necessary as India, despite being a nuclear-armed state, is not a signatory to the NPT.

The ratification is a signal by the Narendra Modi government to the world, particularly the US, that it is serious in continuing to implement the Indo-US nuclear deal. This assumes significance since Modi is scheduled to travel to Washington to meet President Barack Obama in September.

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    Anil Kumar
    Jun 24, 2014 at 6:11 am
    India not following the IAEA sauards properly can also bring another ushima, already we have seen the Bhopal radioactive gas leak accident now the nuclear disaster will be a major accident. India has other alternative energy resources that are safe and must be adopted.
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    Jimmy
    Jun 24, 2014 at 5:07 am
    India currently has 22 nuclear reactors and according to the Indo-US Deal, it will put 14 of its reactors under IAEA sauards. India has also privilege to use formilitary purposes fissile material produced by the remaining 8 reactors. India will have the options to use its any newly built reactor for civilian or military purposes.
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  3. L
    Lizzy
    Jun 24, 2014 at 3:43 pm
    India’s production of weapon grade plutonium is currently constrained by the competing demands of India’s nuclear-power reactors for its limited domestic supply of natural uranium. If India could import fuel for its civilian nuclear reactors, it could use more domestic uranium for the production of weapon materials.
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  4. L
    Lizzy
    Jun 24, 2014 at 3:45 pm
    Three areas raise potential concerns: whether the separation plan is adequate to ensure that cooperation does not in any way ist in the development or production of nuclear weapons; whether cooperation confers nuclear weapons state status on India, with an unintended consequence of encouraging the Indian nuclear weapons program; and whether opening up the international uranium market frees up India’s domestic uranium for use in its weapons program.
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    Pushpaj Mahabahu
    Jun 24, 2014 at 3:53 pm
    This civilian nuclear deal should not be acceptable to India as it compromises India’s independence and sovereignty. It is governed by a law – a US law, the Hyde act which basically prevents India from taking its own strategic decisions; all our decision-making will be subject to scrutiny & approval by the US president & US congress. We will be completely dependent on foreign supplies – which are not guaranteed anywhere for any length of time.
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