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From a Delhi room, relief is monitored

The group said it also has volunteers in the functional hospitals who are updating them with medicine requirements.

Written by Sumegha Gulati | New Delhi | Updated: September 15, 2014 1:21 am
Residents try to get cellphone signals on the roof of a building, in Srinagar on Sunday. (Source: IE photo by Tashi Tobgyal) Residents try to get cellphone signals on the roof of a building, in Srinagar on Sunday. (Source: IE photo by Tashi Tobgyal)

A sparsely furnished room in south Delhi’s Kalkaji locality has become a “control-room” to monitor and organise relief work in flood-hit Jammu and Kashmir.

An old dining table surrounded with rickety chairs is the centre of action with volunteers managing rescue operations, relief dispatch and information dissemination through social media. A bulletin board boasts contact details of NGOs, airline officials, truck drivers, airport volunteers, Jamia and JNU ‘point’ persons.

The ‘Kashmiri Volunteers in Delhi: Flood Relief’ was formed last week, after floods ravaged parts of Jammu and Kashmir. Comprising largely of Kashmiri students and professionals living in the Capital, it operates from the house of a young filmmaker from Aligarh, Aman Kaleem.

Kaleem, who founded the group with her friends from Kashmir, many of them students and journalists, said they are focussing on two aspects — rescuing those stranded and providing relief material to them. The group also ensures coordination between all donation points across the country. According to her, two volunteers from Delhi went to Kashmir a few days ago and are now at the Srinagar airport, coordinating relief efforts.

“They are collecting the stuff we send them from Delhi and passing it on to local volunteers to be distributed across Kashmir. Medicines are our priority right now. We sent drinking water as all water there is contaminated. We also sent chlorine for water purification. We are also collecting baby food, sanitary napkins, packed food, biscuits, life jackets for the victims as well as our volunteers and tents for those rescued,” Kaleem (26) said.

The group, which has partnered with an NGO Community Youth Collective, said it also has volunteers in the functional hospitals who are updating them with medicine requirements. The group is also coordinating the information network. “The information network is heavily relying on social media,” Kaleem said.

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  1. Arun Sharma
    Sep 15, 2014 at 8:36 am
    If hospitals in J & K are not working, then what their doctors are doing? they all should help patients there.
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      RK Handa
      Sep 15, 2014 at 6:25 am
      It's nice that Kashmiri community in Delhi,students,journalists and others from different professions have come together to contribute their efforts to flood relief mission.This is a spirit of dedication that they are working vigorously to mobilise help for the flood bartered people of the State.This group is running its operation from a small room of Kalkaji in South Delhi with almost no furniture of other infrastructure...It would be appreciable if a room in sprawling mansions of Kashmir House at 5, Prithviraj road or the one at Chanakyapuri be spared to facilitate the relief work....This is a war against floods in Kashmir which the entire nation is fighting....
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        RK Handa
        Sep 15, 2014 at 6:46 am
        One fails to understand why WHO ( World Health Organisation) does not step in to contribute towards alleviating medical related problems of thousands of suffering citizens of Srinagar and other parts of the valley. On other occasions even in minisicule cases of diseases and even fear of outbreak of any epidemic,WHO has moved in aggressively in a country threatened by such problems. Kashmir at this time is on the edge of disastrous situation..Thousands require immediate medical attention.There is a great shortage of medical staff,medicines and other facilities particularly in far off helmets of the Valley.There is a threat of break out of epidemics.It is highly essential that teams of WHO visit the Valley and suggest as well as take remedial measures appropriate to the enormity of the grave situation facing Srinagar and other towns of the Valley
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