US attorney Preet Bharara to attend counter-terror conference in Delhi

The conference is being organised by the NIA at the Intelligence Bureau headquarters here on September 7-8, home ministry sources said.

Written by Deeptiman Tiwary | New Delhi | Published:September 5, 2016 1:32 am
preet bharara 759 US Attorney Preet Bharara.

US Attorney Preet Bharara, who played a key role in the prosecution of Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade in 2013, will be hosted by India as one of the main guests at a counter-terror meet in Delhi.

Bharara, a prosecutor once tipped to become the US attorney general, is among a dozen top officials from the US Department of Justice and FBI who have been invited to attend a conference on “Use of Internet in Terror”.

The conference is being organised by the NIA at the Intelligence Bureau headquarters here on September 7-8, home ministry sources said.

Top counter-terror officials from Germany, France, the UK, Malaysia and Bangladesh will participate in the conference. Counter-terror officials from all major Indian state police forces will also attend. “We are expecting about 70-80 people,” an official said.

Bharara and his office hit the headlines in India in December 2013 when Deputy Consul General of India in New York Devyani Khobragade was arrested. The prosecution accused her of making false statements in the visa application of an Indian help at her home in New York. The incident turned into a diplomatic standoff between India and the US as Khobragade was strip searched and kept in custody with drug peddlers.

As sections of the media accused his office of racial discrimination, Bharara, a US citizen born in India, claimed that Khobragade was accorded courtesies well beyond what other defendants, most of whom are US citizens, are accorded.

Bharara, currently the US attorney for the Southern District of New York, is expected to throw light on legal issues involved with propagation of terrorism over the internet internationally and share the US experience of prosecution in such cases.

“The fight against terrorism has to be more cyber than terrestrial now… That is why the need for the conference was felt,” a senior security establishment official said.