Soldier martyred in Poonch was due to marry in February next

"Gursewak was trying to support the family. He was our only earning hand," said Poonch martyr Gursewak's father.

Written by KAMALDEEP SINGH BRAR | Warana (tarn Taran) | Published:November 7, 2016 4:50 am
Gursewak, Poonch martyr, martyr, LoC firing, cross border firing, ceasefire violations, India-pakistan, india news, indian express Father Balwinder Singh with a picture of Gursewak Singh. (Source: Express photo)

The village of Gursewak Singh, who was killed in Poonch sector on Sunday, is angry. He is the second martyr from the village which has a long tradition to send men in Army. Gursewak’s marriage was fixed for February next year and he was to come to village in last week of January.
Gursewak’s body couldn’t reach his village on Sunday. The family was expecting to get the body by 5 pm. Now, the body is expected to reach village by Monday morning. Villagers have made arrangements as they have been expecting large crowd for the cremation.

Gursewak’s father Balwinder Singh said, “Gursewak got job in the Army three years back. We have negligible land. His elder brother Jasbir Singh is also jobless. Gursewak was trying to support the family. He was our only earning hand. When life was coming on track, God did this to us.”

Hindveer Singh, former sarpanch of the Village, said, “Gursewak’s death has not only shocked his family, but the whole village. We have around 70 youths serving in army. If we include the ex-servicemen, the total number reaches to around 200. Most of the families have negligible land in our village and Army is a respected profession. So Gursewak’s loss is loss of all villagers. Everyone is worried about their loved ones serving in Army.”

Soldier Gurwinder Singh, posted in Assam, was also shocked at the news of Gursewak’s death. “I and Gursewak were close friends. We both used to do practice for recruitment in the Army. We were selected together. Again, we got training together. We lived in same room during out training. I regret the fact that I was posted in Assam and he got stationed in Kashmir. If we were serving together, we would have fought together to give a befitting reply to the enemy,” said Gurwinder, who was incidentally in the village on a 45-day leave.

Manjinder Singh, an ex-serviceman from village, said, “Government should decide what it wants. If they want to fight Pakistan, there should be proper fight. We can take possession of all the Pakistan. But our soldiers should not be let killed in this proxy war. We have a high number of youth in the Army. We are ready to sacrifice.”

One Sohan Singh from the village was killed in Sri Lanka in late 80s when the Indian Army was there to fight the LTTE. Gursewak’s elder brother Jasbir Singh said, “I have no job. Though Gursewak was younger to me, we had fixed his marriage as he had a job. We were making preparations for his marriage that was fixed in February. But Sunday morning, we came to know of the news. We are shattered.” Jasbir is yet to marry.

Hindveer said, “The family is poor and they have lost their earning hand. The government should provide a job to elder brother Jasbir Singh.”