Punjab too reeling under dengue sting: Mohali worst hit, followed by Amritsar

As per the data made available by the state’s Health department, as many as 1,717 cases of dengue have been reported in the state till date.

By: Express News Service | Chandigarh | Updated: September 21, 2016 3:39 am
punjab, punjab dengue, mohali, mohali dengue, chandigarh denue, amritsar dengue, dengue deaths, punjab dengue cases, punjab dengue treatment, punjab news Patients in queue outside emergency ward at Government Hospital in Chandigarh on Tuesday. (Express Photo by Sahil Walia)

With alarm bells ringing in the National Capital over the dengue and chikungunya deaths, the situation in Punjab is no different. Even as the virus continue to spread across the state, Mohali has turned out to be the city with maximum dengue cases followed closely by the Amritsar and Patiala

As per the data made available by the state’s Health department, as many as 1,717 cases of dengue have been reported in the state till date. The figure for the corresponding period for dengue cases stood at 1,741. If officials are to be believed than the figure will rise steeply in days to come due to the favourable weather conditions for breeding of the vector-borne disease.

Mohali has so far reported 517 cases of dengue while the figure for Amritsar stood at 326 till today. Patiala has reported 136 cases while Sangrur has reported 129 cases of the disease. Jalandhar is the next highest in the list with 114 cases of dengue. In comparison, 23 confirmed cases of chikungunya has come to light so far. The figure for the corresponding period had stood at 18.

According to Dr Gagandeep Singh Grover, State Programme Officer of the National Vector Borne Disease Control Programme (NVBDCP), 12 deaths had been initially attributed to dengue but a detailed investigation revealed that four of the cases were not attributed to the disease. “Investigation is still on in eight cases in order to find out if the cause of death was due to dengue,” he said. In 2015, as many as 28 patients were reported to have died due to the disease while the total number of cases were as high as 14,000 throughout the year.

“September and October are the months when the dengue spread at a high rate. This is why we have launched several programmes in order to create public awareness so that the disease can be controlled as far as possible,” Dr Grover said. He added that most dengue infections took place because of stagnant pools of water inside the houses and that it is imperative that the pools be cleared once every week. ‘The dengue larvae takes around seven to 10 days to develop into an adult and thus if care is taken to remove all breeding places at least once a week, then the spread of the disease can be controlled to a large degree” he said.