25 years on, Manmohan Singh has a regret: In crisis, we act. When it’s over, back to status quo

Today, July 1, marks the 25th year of the historic devaluation of the rupee that set in motion the irreversible process of opening the Indian economy. The Indian Express speaks to those who unlocked the power of change to ask what then – and what now.

Written by Shaji Vikraman | New Delhi | Mumbai | Updated: July 24, 2016 10:49 am
Manmohan Singh, opening of Indian economy, 1991 economic reforms, 1991 economic crisis, Manmohan Singh Indian economy, PV Narasimha Rao, RBI, indian rupee, indian rupee against dollar, indian currency rate, indian currency, rupee rate, rbi, indian rupee value, india economic crisis, global credit rating, rupee value, foreign currency, rupee devaluation, business news, currency market, business market, stock exchange, latest news Manmohan Singh, the day before his historic July 1991 Budget. (Express Photo: Praveen Jain)

TOMORROW will mark 25 years since the opening of the economy began with the devaluation of the rupee on July 1, 1991.

And yet the process of economic reforms in India continues to be trapped in the circumstances in which it began: act only when there is a crisis. That’s one of the key takeaways for its prime architect, then Finance Minister and former Prime Minister Manmohan Singh.

Reflecting on the reforms that he, working with Prime Minister P V Narasimha Rao, set in motion, Singh opened up to The Indian Express, in a rare conversation earlier this year, as he mapped the road ahead: opposition from within, role of the Prime Minister’s “political management,” fear of “blood and tears,” and the crying “need to revisit old orthodoxies.”

READ | On this day 25 years ago, an invaluable devaluation

Edited excerpts:

1991 and the Budget of July was a watershed in India’s economic and political history. There was so much done. Industrial de-licensing on Budget day, trade policy, exchange rate management and much more. How do you look back on that period? Were those ideas or solutions known already to policy-makers or were they imposed by multilateral lenders as critics claim?

I don’t see much originality in those. These were ideas which were being discussed inside the government and outside, too. All I did was put them all together in a coherent whole, when I got an opportunity. The Budget for 1991 set out the roadmap that we wanted to adopt for the next two to three years. It gave SEBI legal status. Before that, SEBI was no more than an advisory body. The banking system needed reforms and I announced the setting up of the Narasimham committee on financial sector reforms. Then, there were tax reforms.

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Trade policy reforms were critical, weren’t they?

Yes. There was some work done earlier I think by Montek Singh (Ahluwalia).

P Chidambaram was very supportive. Without him, the trade policy would not have moved as fast as it did.

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Is it true that the trade policy reforms were finalised in a matter of just two days?

That’s certainly true, as we were in a hurry. Chidambaram and I went to meet Prime Minister Narasimha Rao and the Prime Minister turned to me and said, ‘What do you think?’ and I said, ‘I entirely endorse it’. That was the end of it, and the Prime Minister put his signature on it.

What was the level of opposition to reforms? How did you surmount it?

There was a lot of opposition in the country and within the party (Congress). But Prime Minister Rao’s political management made it possible to overcome all that. I was a loner and had no group. Even in the Congress Parliamentary Party meeting, when the Budget was being discussed, there was a lot of opposition and the only people who supported me, (were) in favour of what I had done, were Nathuram Mirdha and Mani Shankar Aiyar.

One of the steps taken was on exchange rate management. What strategy did you have in mind?

We had to tackle the exchange rate at the start because there was a lot of speculation on the rupee’s future. And if we had not acted creatively then, the whole system would have been impacted with dire consequences. We did the exchange rate adjustment in two steps. The first step was to test the waters: what the public reaction would be, the reaction within the government and reaction from the opposition. So although there was opposition to the move, it was manageable. So I said by July 3 (1991), we must complete the full thing. C Rangarajan was the Deputy Governor (of RBI). Even then there was opposition. And Prime Minister Narasimha Rao had doubts over the second instalment of the exchange rate adjustment and told me, in fact, to stop it. But when I called up Rangarajan, he said that he had already shot the goal. Therefore, that was the end of it. He had already announced the new exchange rate. What we had announced was not any formal devaluation. We said that it was a market-driven adjustment.

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That government had to mortgage gold because of the BoP crisis. What are your recollections?

By the time the government took over, one instalment of gold had already been mortgaged and dispatched abroad. I allowed the second one to go without much fanfare. That really shocked the country… the mess that the economy was in. I used that occasion to honour the commitment of the previous government to mortgage gold but at the same time, I sensitised the country on how serious the economic situation was, and that if we do not want to go down the disastrous path, reforms were the only answer.

What about sequencing of reforms — real sector first, financial sector later?

On financial sector reforms, we relatively had only a vague idea. It was only after we appointed the Narasimham committee to do banking reforms that we got going. In the first Budget, we also mentioned granting legislative status to SEBI and abolishing the Controller of Capital Issues. Some reforms we thought through committees. I appointed Raja Chelliah also to work on tax reforms. That couldn’t be done in a month. So we bought time. By the time I announced the second Budget in 1992, those recommendations were taken on board. We introduced VAT and started the process of reduction in Customs duties.

Wasn’t there resistance to new stock exchange?

The National Stock Exchange was strongly opposed by Bombay stockbrokers and captains of industry. I thought some competition is good. The exchange has given a very good account of itself.

One of the biggest changes was in allowing foreign investment in a closed economy.

I was going to England and I knew the city would be interested. So I had prepared for that route of reforms. It was also in London, if I remember, and I may be wrong, that I announced the opening up of the Indian markets to foreign investment. Over a period of time, we built it and moved cautiously and opened up a lot later.

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Were you surprised by the improvement in many macro economic indicators after a year?

The economy recovered faster than we (had) thought. When I took over, I said that the next three years will be nothing but blood and tears. Ultimately, I said that I had confidence that the economy would emerge victorious from this crisis but there were no shortcuts. And the economy recovered faster. Inflation came down, the Balance of Payments situation turned around sooner than I anticipated.

What about ideological differences at the start of the reform process?

Well, when you are in a hurry, you don’t worry too much about ideological issues that will come in the way. I knew that if it did not work, I could have been the scapegoat. I was prepared for that.

How was the famous Bombay Club opposition to the reforms tackled?

The Bombay Club and traditional industrialists were opposed to it. I talked to a number of people — industry, politicians, people in state governments. I talked to the press also often then, and we slowly managed to overcome the resistance. In the very first week itself, there was opposition to the reforms agenda. So I managed to secure the support of P N Dhar, K N Raj, I G Patel and R N Malhotra. They came out with a statement supporting the reform process. I think the Left was against it.

Again, without A N Verma, the principal secretary to the Prime Minister, the support from the civil service would not have been as strong as it turned out to be. I wanted the PM’s Secretariat to be consciously involved in pushing the reform process.

Looking back now, how much of a change have those reforms signified to Indian industry 25 years on?

Certainly, Indian industry is much more confident. They are the children of the 1991 reforms. We removed wealth tax in the 1991 budget. That is one way in which the children of those who had wealth could put money honestly into their enterprises. Now they all feel that we did a good thing.

The fact is that some of the reforms launched in 1991 were being considered in the aborted Budget of the Chandra Shekhar government. What are your thoughts on that?

What I am saying is that what we did wasn’t original. There were ideas which were in the air. Several discussions had taken place but the political system was not responsive to implementing those reforms.

Halfway through, the government was hit by the 1992 stock market scam. How much of a setback was that?

It only gave a handle to the opponents of reforms to blackmail us. Fortunately, they didn’t find anything wrong in what I had done. They said that I should have been more active. In hindsight, there is always scope to do better. Even then, I submitted my resignation to the Prime Minister saying that since the constructive responsibility is that of the finance minister, I think it is appropriate that I resign. I gave the Prime Minister my letter of resignation, which he kept for six to seven days and sent it back later saying, ‘You continue’.

The 1990s were also marked by a convergence of like-minded policy advisors in the government and engagement of outside experts and economists to advise the government. How was it done?

I wanted to sensitise the people of India on the need to revisit old orthodoxies. It was therefore helpful when we got a group of young and learned people to back the process that we were embarking upon. So I got Nicholas Stern involved; Jagdish Bhagwati and T N Srinivasan; Vijay Joshi from Oxford. As early as 1973, I got Bimal Jalan from ICICI to join the government. Then, when I was the finance minister, I got Montek Singh to the finance ministry, brought in Shankar Acharya as chief economic advisor, Ashok Desai as advisor, Rakesh Mohan in the Planning Commission and Arvind Virmani in the Planning Commission.

Why was it difficult to do that subsequently?

Earlier, we could do all that because the Indian Economic Service was small and nobody felt threatened. So I could bring in a lot of young professional economists. But later, the IES felt that their opportunities for career advancement and promotions were being denied.

And similarly, lateral entry in the government was such a formidable challenge, wasn’t it?

But we managed to bring in Raghuram Rajan. I spotted him and first engaged him as an honorary advisor to the Prime Minister. Then when the position of the chief economic advisor fell vacant, we got him there and he told us that when the time for the RBI Governorship comes, he should be considered for the job. I was able to honour that commitment. P Chidambaram agreed with me, and that appointment turned out to be a creative one.

Having been a Governor of the RBI yourself, how do you see the differences between the central bank and the government?

There have always been differences between the finance minister and the RBI Governor. But in our time, the relationship was smooth. Rangarajan was a superb technocrat and I had known him for 20 to 25 years. During our time when I was the finance minister, we entered into a historic agreement with the RBI on doing away with automatic monetisation of the deficit. Rangarajan wanted it and I endorsed it. It was one way to ensure that financial policy was supportive of what we wanted to do. When I was the finance minister, I got on well with the RBI Governor.

But didn’t you offer to quit as RBI Governor when the government decided to take away the powers of the RBI on licensing of foreign banks?

I had strong feelings on that. Ultimately, the government saw reason and it didn’t happen. As RBI Governor, I felt strongly that the step would be detrimental to the status of the RBI.

Was your term as finance minister professionally satisfying?

Well, I came to India soon after a bypass surgery. When the offer came to become finance minister, my friends advised me not to take it up as it could kill me, they said. So I said, ‘how does it matter if I die in the process of serving one’s own country, it is alright’.

Twenty-five years later, with the economy now way bigger, and with a greater acceptance to opening up, why is it difficult to carry out reforms?

I think in a crisis, we act constructively. When it is over, status quo takes over. But I think it is remarkable that even if the process was put in place by a Congress-led government, the next United Front government, led by H D Deve Gowda and I K Gujral, carried forward the process. In fact, Chidambaram presented what came to be known as a ‘dream budget’. Then came the BJP government which also continued the reform process.

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    Abhinav Gour
    Jul 1, 2016 at 3:31 am
    He was a great finance as well as a great primeminister. We had the best gdp for consecutive years under his rule( not the tweaked present gdp) . We sucessfuly overcame 2 recessions. Growth slowed down due to external factors and the need to curb inflation in the last 2 years.Agreed there were ppl who were corrupt , but no one was sheilded.
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      Abhinav Gour
      Jul 1, 2016 at 3:36 am
      The present lot is only boasting of doing this when everything is in doldrums. The foreign policy has gone to dogs with no constincency in approach. The rafale deal which was shown as a huge sucess but even after 2 yrs it has not materalised. Lost the technology transfer no delivery yet.
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      1. J
        Jonnalagadda Achyutananda
        Jul 1, 2016 at 11:50 am
        Dr. Manmohan Singh shined under narasimha rao.he would have been like moon with out rays of sun.his guidance to rao to open upm markets was really great. However dr Singh was a big failure and disappointing except nuclear power deal with US.much interference from dynasty might be reason for his flopshow.but the great economist need not necessarily a be great prime minister but should not have been shacked by extra powers.
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        1. I
          indian
          Jun 30, 2016 at 11:05 pm
          He was a good finance minister. Not that great a prime minister
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          1. D
            Dipak Bose
            Jul 3, 2016 at 3:58 am
            In 1966, IMF told India what to do: stop the Five years Plan for 3 years. india had to do it. Sachin Chowdhury was discredited as a result.lt;br/gt;In 1992, IMf told India to devalue, privatize, stop planning. india had to do it. MM Singh got the credit.lt;br/gt;why???????
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            1. I
              IslamForFooools
              Jul 1, 2016 at 4:48 am
              Isis is what u Muslims are, don't tel me u r not Muslim, u r worst than Muslim u r not muslim
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              1. G
                Gopal
                Jul 3, 2016 at 10:45 pm
                An educated and so called economist and recruited chaprasi of sonia. He lived true to her salt.
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                1. H
                  Hrithik
                  Jul 6, 2016 at 12:52 pm
                  Remember Gujarat, Dadri, the rationalist murders etc etc. Why being so selective?
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                  1. J
                    Jamboo
                    Jul 1, 2016 at 4:25 pm
                    Desh ch0d , chor, bhad vaa aadmi is Manmohan Singh. lt;br/gt;lt;br/gt;Reforms were brain child and political resolve of Late PVN Rao and not of this liar MM Singh. In this interview this liar now igns Dr Swamy's paper on liberalization to Montek Singh who is also boot licker of himself and 10 JP uri ne drinker.lt;br/gt;He himself was PM and what could he do or got from his FM's? Now this desh ch0d comes to claim on LAte PVN Rao's work, he will die a stray dogs death unlike AB Vajpayee who is suffering a tortoise life.lt;br/gt;lt;br/gt;He only did 2G, Coal, Antrix devas, Vadra land deals, scams and looted m money to pay to Sonia for his appointment. lt;br/gt;lt;br/gt;Fortunate for him he is India and is not being shot for scams like is done in China.
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                      Manjunath
                      Jul 1, 2016 at 3:17 am
                      But he failed to give credit to Subramanian Swamy who gave Narasimha Rao the framework of economic reforms and asked the congress government to implement it. Rao and MM Singh just implemented the reforms where as Swamy was the real architect behind reforms.
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                        Mitul
                        Jul 2, 2016 at 10:09 am
                        It is because of these great leaders Indian is at this stage in world economics... Many people wrote about MMS and Sonia... But in my opinion it was under MMS guidance were in 2008 India was one of the few countries that didn't get effected by the usa meltdown.. People like to point fingers about what went wrong but what about all the things that went right ...
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                          Cooldude
                          Jul 1, 2016 at 12:01 am
                          A genuine and honest person. Not even a single word against anyone or boasting of his achievements. When we compare it with current set of minsters and their comments, it quite obvious that MMS was great FM and a PM. Like MMS said, "history will be kinder to me than the media". Its quite true.
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                            Navin
                            Jul 1, 2016 at 7:34 am
                            Dr. Singh is Thorough professional and this interview shows it, he credits BJP for continuing the reforms as well. Like he had famously said, history will be kinder to him.
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                              Saurabh
                              Jul 1, 2016 at 8:59 am
                              "ACHIEVEMENTS BY LEGEND S.MANMOHAN SINGH".....lt;br/gt;Indians will remember you for ‪‎RTI‬.....lt;br/gt;We are now the 3rd ‪‎largest‬ economy in the World which was 10th largest in 2004......lt;br/gt;Many Mission's during your tenure like ‪#‎Moon‬, ‪#‎Mars‬, ‪#‎Agni‬, ‪#‎Prithvi‬, ‪#‎Submarine‬ and many more..lt;br/gt;World had got hit with 3 major recession but you made our country stand......lt;br/gt;‪‎Obama‬ say's "When Singh speaks, world listen in G-20 and also praised about the Singh knowledge will be useful for world"....lt;br/gt;‪‎China‬ Say's Dr.Manmohan Singh as a renowned statesman....lt;br/gt;‪Russian‬ President Vladimir Putin praised you for the contribution to BRICS .....lt;br/gt;Dr.Singh has been awarded as "‪World Statesman‬ Award" and many more....lt;br/gt;Inspite of endless number of persons who barked at you, you remained silenced......lt;br/gt;‪#‎GSALUTE‬.....
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                                SubbuI
                                Jul 1, 2016 at 3:45 am
                                Hallo. Don't insult feku. Double M.A from Model Gurarat university. He would have done another 10 visit to U.S to give bashans and by now got our entry in Security Councillt;br/gt;Jaatly shall count his and make next budget lt;br/gt;Muchad will bring back Ram Rajya-khel katham ln 2019lt;br/gt;MMS can take over. Pappu can become baap don't forget gungi gudia became Durgama
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                                  Abhishek Pandey
                                  Jul 1, 2016 at 3:39 am
                                  Beyond doubt he is another ex-PM, ex-FM, rbi gov n above all an Indian to be proud of. He will get his credit in his obituary and later on because of this filthy party politics.
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                                    Aditya Gaiha
                                    Jul 1, 2016 at 4:53 pm
                                    ic and intellectually dishonest person. Kept sleeping for 10 years when in power. India is full of such hypocrites who keep saying things that should be done but never do it when they get such golden opportunities. Suddenly he wakes up like a rip van winkle......
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                                      Ayesha Tabassum
                                      Jul 1, 2016 at 5:52 pm
                                      Must read interview.
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                                        Ayesha Tabassum
                                        Jul 1, 2016 at 5:43 pm
                                        Respect for our former PM Manmohan Singh has increased immensely. We can't fathom the depth of this man. Wow! Him keeping silent and not bragging about his achievements is a mark of a true gentleman. Mere mortals like yours truly can do the least service to him by just sharing his latest interview. Respect. Here's an excerpt:lt;br/gt;lt;br/gt;Was your term as finance minister professionally satisfying?lt;br/gt;Well, I came to India soon after a byp surgery. When the offer came to become finance minister, my friends advised me not to take it up as it could kill me, they said. So I said, ‘how does it matter if I die in the process of serving one’s own country, it is alright’.
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                                          katdare
                                          Jul 1, 2016 at 7:40 am
                                          MANMOHAN IS THE BEST PRIME MINISTER WE HAD. HE TALKED LESS AND WORKED MORE
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                                            Anjana Sankar
                                            Jul 3, 2016 at 4:41 pm
                                            Looking back on economic liberalization and putting an end to license raj. Opening the floodgates to foreign investment and privatization.
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