IT industry must step up on innovation to meet challenges, says Hamid Ansari

The reason behind ranking 66th out of 128 countries was the education system in India is seeped in implementors and not thinkers, said Ansari.

By: PTI | New Delhi | Published:November 5, 2016 4:08 pm
Indian IT industry, Vice President Hamid Ansari, Nasscom President, China, Russia and South Africa, Ansari, N R Narayana Murthy, Global Innovation Index 2016, Latest news, India news national news Reflecting on the 60 years of innovation pioneered in IT sector in the country, Vice President Hamid Ansari called for a “serious soul searching” on why India is now lagging behind many others. PTI Photo

Indian IT industry will have to step up on innovation amid challenges like need for new products, digital disruption and shrinking manpower requirements triggered by software automation, Vice President Hamid Ansari said today.

“Challenges will come in the short and intermediate term from the industry’s shift such as cloud computing, evolution in software as a service model, need to develop new products, digital disruption and shrinking manpower needs because of software automation,” Ansari said while inaugurating the new headquarters of software association Nasscom.

Asking the Indian IT industry to be “more innovative”, Ansari said that clients will increasingly look for “innovation partners rather than software partners”.

“Even with the growth trajectory so well charted, Nasscom President himself has admitted that below the calm waters, there is a lot of churn happening, and companies will have to do a lot of things to address the challenges as well,” he said.

Lauding the role of IT sector, he said that it has been a major contributor to India’s growth story in the last 25 years by way of an improved brand image, creating employment, contributing to GDP growth, creating avenues in technology education and contributing to e-governance.

“…the IT industry pioneers in india had a tough beginning having to battle against ignorance, inadequate infrastructure, lack of skilled manpower, the general public fear of losing jobs because of computers and almost no government support,” he said.

Alluding to IT doyen N R Narayana Murthy’s earlier observation that there had been no earth-shaking innovation from India in the last 60 years, Ansari said the matter called for a “serious soul searching” on why India lagged behind many others.

Citing the Global Innovation Index 2016 – where India was ranked 66 out of 128 countries, behind China, Russia and South Africa, Ansari said that one of the reasons for this is an education system seeped in training implementors and not thinkers.

Other factors included significant lack of appetite for taking risks as families and educational institues have a ‘play safe’ attitude, lack of start up funding environment, and slow pace and inefficiencies of legal systems that act a deterrent to innovative spirit.