Infant trafficking case: Two more doctors held in Kolkata

The nursing home was directly involved in selling babies of unmarried, poor women to couples for a massive sum depending on the gender and complexion of the baby.

By: Express News Service | Kolkata | Published:December 1, 2016 1:20 am

The state CID arrested two doctors in the newborn trafficking case on Wednesday, taking the total number of arrests made in connection with the racket to 20.

“Two more doctors, Dr Dilip Ghosh and Dr Nityananda Biswas have been arrested,” said DIG (CID) B L Meena. Dr Ghosh was first questioned by the CID through the night on Monday. He was questioned again on Wednesday, and subsequently arrested.

According to CID sources, Dr Ghosh was connected to the Sri Krishna Nursing Home on College Street from 1994 to 2012. The nursing home was directly involved in selling babies of unmarried, poor women to couples for a massive sum depending on the gender and complexion of the baby. Partha Chatterjee, owner of the nursing home and Dr Santosh Samanta, who worked there, have already been arrested. Sources said Dr Ghosh maintained a close relationship Dr Samanta even after 2012.

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“Dr Ghosh was not just connected to Sri Krishna Nursing Home as a doctor. The exact ownership contracts of that nursing home need to be verified. Both (Samanta and Biswas) claim to be doctors, but we have to verify this,” said an official.

A day before his arrest, Dr Ghosh had told The Indian Express, “I have nothing to hide and I am ready to cooperate.” BJP state chief Dilip Ghosh had confirmed that the accused was a party member who had contested in the Bidhannagar Municipal Corporation.

The other accused, Dr Biswas, was associated with the Moharananado Bramhachari Sishu Seva Kendra in Behala, said sources. CID officials have recorded the statement of one Asish Sarkar, who has alleged that his baby was exchanged by Dr Biswas under the instruction of Tapan Biswas, who has already been arrested. Sarkar’s daughter was born in July 2014. He alleged that Dr Biswas had told him that she suffered a heart condition, for which she should be operated. He later said the child had died during the procedure. Dr Biswas allegedly produced a decomposed body, which Sarkar was not sure belonged to his daughter. On reading of the case in the newspapers, Sarkar approached the CID.

CID officials said the ambit of the racket was growing each day. “Everyone used to get commission for their service. Basically, it started with conducting abortions for unmarried women. Later, the key accused got in touch with NGOs, who in turn were in touch with childless couples willing to buy babies. They used these unborn women to supply the newborn babies. As their business grew, so did the demand for babies. To fulfil those demands, they started targeting new parents by telling them that their babies were stillborn. The NGOs used to even handover the list of babies and their types to this (Sri Krishna) nursing home. The nursing home had a deadline within which they were supposed to supply the babies,” said a source.