In Hyderabad, antibiotics and IV drips to keep goats healthy

With increasing awareness through social media that sacrificial animals should be healthy, and also due to appeals from various Muslim organisations, more people are visiting veterinarian clinics this year, traders said.

Written by Sreenivas Janyala | Hyderabad | Updated: September 13, 2016 10:25 am
hyderabad-759 At the main ‘bakri mandi’ in Hyderabad on Monday. (AP photo)

Antibiotics and intravenous (IV) drips for goats, days or even hours before they are sacrificed? It’s taking place in Hyderabad this year.

With many goats unwell due to the rains and poor hygienic conditions at the ‘bakri mandi’ of main Mehdipatnam market, a large number of Muslims in the city are making sure that goats and sheep they have bought get a thorough medical checkup ahead of Bakr-Eid.

On Sunday and Monday, tens of anxious goat traders and people who bought the animal last week for sacrifice on Eid brought the goats to the Directorate of Animal Husbandry’s veterinary hospital at Masab Tank. Most of the animals were found suffering from cold and fever — or they just looked unhealthy due to the damp weather.

With increasing awareness through social media that sacrificial animals should be healthy, and also due to appeals from various Muslim organisations, more people are visiting veterinarian clinics this year, traders said.

Shabbir, an autorickshaw driver who brought his goat to the veterinary hospital in his vehicle Monday, said, “I bought it last week for qurbani, and it is sneezing continuously for the last three days and has stopped eating. I did not notice earlier but there is a small cut on its shoulder as well — probably received in the market. An unhealthy goat cannot be sacrificed, so I brought it here.”

Shabbir said the animal was given antibiotics and IV drip, and now looks a “little better”.

Dr V Varaprasad Reddy, regional director for Hyderabad and Ranga Reddy districts in the Animal Husbandry Department, said there is no prevalence of any disease as such among goats but the animals tend to fall sick in the crowded enclosures they are kept in. “Cold and fever are common, and since there is increased awareness among Muslims that the goat should be healthy, they are also getting the animals checked,” Dr Reddy said.

At Mehdipatnam goat market on Monday, a day before Eid, trader Iliyas Sheikh, said, “Buyers are checking the teeth, ears, horns, and legs, etc this time. People are even showing me a list of dos and don’ts on WhatsApp.”