Delhi pollution: NGT bans construction activities for a week, raps govt for sprinkling water by cranes and not helicopter

The tribunal also questioned the Delhi government over its decision to shut schools due to air pollution, asking if any scientific study was conducted before giving such order.

By: Express Web Desk | Updated: November 8, 2016 6:15 pm
The National Green Tribunal office in New Delhi. Express Photo by Tashi Tobgyal New Delhi 080415 The National Green Tribunal office in New Delhi. Express Photo by Tashi Tobgyal New Delhi 080415

To check the alarming pollution level in Delhi, the National Green Tribunal on Tuesday banned construction activities for one week in Delhi and National Capital Region. The tribunal ruled that no stone crusher and brick kiln should operate for one week in the region.

WATCH VIDEO: NGT Raps Delhi Govt Over Air Pollution: Find Out What It Said

It slammed Punjab, Haryana, Rajasthan and UP for not taking prior steps to control crop burning and ordered the states to give complete mechanism on implementation of its directions to curb air pollution.

The tribunal also questioned the Delhi government over its decision to shut schools due to air pollution, asking if any scientific study was conducted before giving such order. It lashed out at Delhi government for showing ‘laxity’ while dealing with alarming situation of air pollution and smog in the city.

Questioning the government’s decision to sprinkle water using cranes, the NGT asked why helicopters were not being used to do the same.

Delhi’s air quality has steadily worsened after Diwali. Apart from crackers’ smoke, burning of crop stubble in farms contributed to the thick cover of hazardous haze that has been shrouding the city for nearly a week.

WATCH VIDEO: Here’s How The Supreme Court Describe Delhi’s Air Pollution

The air quality have levels of harmful PM 2.5 particles hovering at dangerous levels, something that has been seen in cities like Beijing.

These fine particles less than 2.5 micrometres in diameter are linked to higher rates of chronic bronchitis, lung cancer and heart disease.