No custom, tradition should stop a citizen from praying, says activist Brinda Adige

Brinda Adige said the right of women to pray should be upheld and the state government’s move ensures that the dignity and equality of women is respected.

By: ANI | Bengaluru | Updated: November 8, 2016 8:46 am
Brinda Adige, Sabarimala Temple, women entry to temples, Sabarimala controversy, Sabarimala women entry, Sabarimala kerala, india news Brinda Adige. (Source: File/ANI)

Social activist Brinda Adige has welcomed the Kerala government’s decision to allow women inside the sanctum sanctorum of the Sabarimala Temple, saying that no custom or tradition should deny the constitutional right of every Indian citizen to pray. “The present stand that the government has taken is welcomed. Few people are questioning their move, but customs and traditions cannot over rule constitutional right. Constitutional right for a citizen to pray is something no custom or tradition should stop,” Adige told ANI.

Watch what else is making news:

Adige said the right of women to pray should be upheld and the state government’s move ensures that the dignity and equality of women is respected.

The Kerala Government on Monday told the Supreme Court that it is ready to allow women inside the sanctum sanctorum of Sabarimala Temple. The next hearing in this matter is scheduled to be held on February 20, 2017.

This was the first hearing of the matter after the Supreme Court changed the bench hearing a decade-old petition against the restriction on women aged between 10 and 50 from entering the temple’s sanctum sanctorum.

Earlier, a three-judge Bench that included Justices Dipak Misra, Gopala V. Gowda and Kurian Joseph, was replaced by Justices Dipak Misra, C. Nagappan and R. Banumathi on July 11.

A total of 10 Supreme Court judges, sitting in various combinations, have already heard the case since it was first filed in 2006.

Earlier, the Bombay High Court had directed that the Maharashtra Government to ensure that women are not denied entry to the temple.

Defending the ban, the Sabarimala Temple administration said the tradition is connected to essential religious practices.

Supporting them, the Kerala Government told the court that beliefs and customs of devotees cannot be changed through a judicial process and that the opinion of the priests is final in matters of religion.

For all the latest India News, download Indian Express App

  1. T
    T S
    Nov 8, 2016 at 9:46 am
    This is purely related to Hindu religion customs and beliefs and not only that every State has different type of customs. How far it is correct to involve by the courts to direct the temple authorities, they should question them self. When involving in other religions issues they are protesting saying that it is purely their religion customs and courts cannot involve in it.
    Reply
    1. B
      Balaji
      Nov 8, 2016 at 3:36 am
      Yes everybody, even every soul, has the right to pray the God. If God is everywhere In the heart of everybody Then why we the human beings created artificial law prohibiting the women from praying the God. Whether the God is not in the heart of women member. If he is there means he does not find any problem then why we the human beings find the problem.
      Reply