Waste treatment: 2 plants to yield 400 million litres non-potable water in Mumbai

The projects at Worli and Bandra will cost the civic body at least Rs 1,500 crore each and sludge could be used to generate electricity.

By: Express News Service | Mumbai | Published:September 11, 2016 3:44 am
BMC, Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation, Mumbai Municipal corporation, Waste water treatment, Mumbai Sewage Disposal Project, Worli, Bandra, water, plants, industry, waste water management, Mumbai, Mumbai news, India, India news Of the two plants, the one at Lovegrove in Worli is likely to be a multi-storey structure with a maximum capacity of 756.9 million litres of sewage waste, which will be built on 14.3 hectares. (Source: Express Photo by Arul Horizon)

The Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation, as part of its Mumbai Sewage Disposal Project (MSDP), is planning to set up two large plants, one at Worli and the other at Bandra.

The projects, which will cost the civic body at least Rs 1,500 crore each, will yield at least 400 million litres of tertiary treated water which the civic body can sell as non-potable water.

Of the two plants, the one at Lovegrove in Worli is likely to be a multi-storey structure with a maximum capacity of 756.9 million litres of sewage waste, which will be built on 14.3 hectares.

MSDP officials said that a new plant would first be constructed on 5.5 hectares of empty land. The existing primary waste treatment plant on the remaining 8.8 hectares will then be demolished and a new one will be built in its place. The plant will process at least 500 million litres of sewage on a daily basis to yield at least 400 million litres of water, which can be reused by commercial users and even housing societies.

The other plant will come up at Bandra on 8.7 hectares near Bandra Reclamation and will have a maximum capacity of processing 796.9 million litres of sewage. Smaller in comparison to the plant in Worli, the Bandra plant will have an average capacity of processing 400 million litres of sewage per day and will yield at least 320 million litres of treated water.

After the tendering process, each project will be given five years to be completed. The contractors will have to keep the plant operational for 15 years.

Additional Municipal Commissioner Sanjay Mukherjee said that the projects were awaiting approval from the Central Pollution Control Board.

“We are waiting for CPCB to give the final discharge norms into coastal water before we can begin the tendering process. The approvals should come in a month’s time and the work is likely to begin within this financial year,” he said.

Mukherjee added that the sludge generated could be utilised to generate electricity.

As part of the MSDP, sewage treatment plants will eventually be set up at other sites including Ghatkopar, Versova, Malad and Bhandup.

When functional, these plants can reduce dependence on the city’s potable water supply. The plant at Colaba, with tertiary treatment facilities, only has a capacity of producing at least 37 million litres of tertiary treated water daily.

Currently, the sewage treatment plants only conduct primary treatment of sewage before it is released into the sea.

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