Chandigarh Capitol Complex becomes World Heritage Site

It was a memorable evening with music leading the way as Ustad Amjad Ali Khan connected with the audience and the special space, talking about classical music and his relationship with the sarod.

Written by Kashish Sharma | Chandigarh | Updated: June 11, 2017 4:46 am
It was none other than Ustad Amjad Ali Khan who created magic with his sarod at the venue, adding beauty to the event, which was graced by Governor V P Singh Badnore and Chandigarh MP Kirron Kher.

It was a special day and moment at the Chandigarh Capitol Complex, a soulful and befitting celebration of the inscription of the complex as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO last year.

It was none other than Ustad Amjad Ali Khan who created magic with his sarod at the venue, adding beauty to the event, which was graced by Governor V P Singh Badnore and Chandigarh MP Kirron Kher.

Chandigarh, its making, the vision of Le Corbusier and how the Capitol Complex achieved the status of the UNESCO World Heritage Site…it was a walk down memory lane for the audience here. Finally, it was Ustad Amjad Ali Khan, who took the evening to another level as he and his sons Amaan Ali Khan and Ayaan Ali Khan, both renowned musicians in their own right, took centre-stage and music filled the air, adding to the grandeur of the space.

“There are many ways to present classical music, but we generally follow the convention. It’s the weakness of us Indians to follow conventions, rules and nobody questions whether it’s music or religion. But tradition allows innovation as there are many beautiful compositions which were created to preserve the raag. So, I begin the recital with a Ganesh Vandana that I conceived when I used to love to sing,” smiled the respected and celebrated classical musician.

It was a memorable evening with music leading the way as Ustad Amjad Ali Khan connected with the audience and the special space, talking about classical music and his relationship with the sarod.

“Music has language, every song has a language. But, in the 13th Century, the Sufi saint, Amir Khusrau, also created a style of singing without language.

He created a language of syllables and sounds and I have created various taranas and the following one is in Raag Bahar,” said the maestro, who mesmerised the audience, promising to return to Chandigarh soon.

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