Can’t have single solution for all of India: Goa CM Manohar Parrikar

Parrikar pointed to the Supreme Court order banning sale of liquor with 500 metres of national highways as an example of a law made with good intention but which had to be tweaked given the ground situation in different states.

Written by Smita Nair | Goa (panaji) | Published:September 16, 2017 2:42 am
Goa desecration of religious symbols, Goa temple desecration, Manohar Parrikar on desecration of religious symbols, Goa police on desecration of religious symbols, indian express news Goa CM Manohar Parrikar (File)

A one-size-fits-all approach cannot be a style of governance in India, given its size, as “what may be good in New Delhi may not be good in Goa”, Goa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar said on Friday. “Be it legislation, judiciary or government, we think that one type, one bracketed (blanket) solution is appropriate for all problems. (But) what may be good in New Delhi may not be good in Goa. It may be actually be negative in Goa — it may not work in Goa,” Parrikar said at an event on ‘Good Governance and Replication of Best Practices’ here.

While many laws may bring in good governance, such laws also contain “certain negativity”, he said. But even then, “I feel these Acts (laws) are necessary”.

Parrikar pointed to the Supreme Court order banning sale of liquor with 500 metres of national highways as an example of a law made with good intention but which had to be tweaked given the ground situation in different states. Observing that the final judgment was revisited, he said, “The basic logic was to punish a drunk driver. (But) after the order, I found many drunk drivers carrying (liquor) bottles. Earlier, what was two pegs or three pegs they drank (from outlets by highways)…now they drink a bottle; they carry (bottles).”

He said that while he appreciates the “extremely positive thought” behind the judgment – “punish a drunk driver” — at the same time “one solution” cannot hold for the whole country. Organised by the Department of Administrative Reforms and Public Grievances (DARPG) here, the two-day seminar, which wound up on Friday, saw bureaucrats from 17 states sharing notes on governance practices in their states.

Parrikar, who spoke last, said that he believed in good governance as far back as in 2002. Recalling his first election campaign in 2002, he said that even senior party leader L K Advani, who had visited Goa at the time, was baffled by his choice of election promise. “When he saw the backdrop (of the dais) — those big words, ‘vote for good governance’, my slogan — he asked me, ‘do you think people will really vote you for governance?”

The chief minister said that no government today can avoid governance issues — and that, too, right from the grassroots levels. “Today, people expect good governance as part and parcel of the original package, not as an additional,” he added.

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