Avoid people who speak against national ethos: Venkaiah Naidu

"We must avoid, ignore people who make noises, speak against the national ethos, values and culture, and then try to dictate their views on us. No, this is not acceptable," said Union minister M Venkaiah Naidu.

By: PTI | New Delhi | Published:July 6, 2017 2:11 pm
M Venkaiah Naidu, M Venkaiah Naidu news, People who speak against national ethos, India news, national news, latest news,  Union minister M Venkaiah Naidu

Union minister M Venkaiah Naidu on Thursday said people who speak against the “national ethos, values and culture” and impose their views on others must be avoided.

Naidu, whose statement comes two days after a Jammu and Kashmir minister told a National Conference leader in the assembly that he could lynch him, also spoke of the late Syama Prasad Mookerjee, founder of the Bharatiya Jana Sangh, the precursor to the BJP. He fought for the unity of country and sacrificed his life for the integration of Jammu and Kashmir with India, Naidu said.

“We should take inspiration from him about the need for national integration. We must avoid, ignore people who make noises, speak against the national ethos, values and culture, and then try to dictate their views on us. No, this is not acceptable.” He was addressing a conference of Prasar Bharati’s Regional News Unit.

“India is a free country, and everybody has got freedom, but this is constitutional limit and others have no right to take their freedom also…including their language, culture, food habits. No other person has the right to dictate to them.

“This is very clear and that is the government’s policy and no human being can call himself great by hurting or hitting the other human being,” the Information and Broadcasting minister added.

Naidu also asserted that what is happening in certain parts of the country should be “isolated” and “condemned”. They should not be “highlighted” to defame the country and the society. The BJP is an alliance partner in the PDP-led government in Jammu and Kashmir.

“I can lynch you here,” state minister Imran Ansari had told National Conference leader Devender Rana in the legislative assembly during a discussion on implementation of GST.

Naidu also told the conference that more emphasis should be given to regional languages and dialects in the process of disseminating news.

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  1. B
    blackpower
    Jul 6, 2017 at 6:13 pm
    SP Mookerjee had no qualms supporting the British even at the height of the freedom struggle - At the time of the Quit India movement in 1942, Mookerjee was the Finance Minister of Bengal and the second most senior minister in the government after Bengal’s Prime Minister, Fazlul Haq. Mookerjee’s party, the Hindu Mahasabha, had decided to cooperate with the colonial government given that, in their view, the real battle was against India’s Muslims. The party even helped the British recruit for World War II, with Vinayak Savarkar appealing for Hindus to enlist in large numbers in the colonial army. In Bengal, Mookerjee stuck to his party line, preparing to cooperate with the British and, as a corollary, oppose the Congress as it prepared to launch its final mass struggle, the 1942 Quit India movement.
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      blackpower
      Jul 6, 2017 at 6:14 pm
      On July 26, 1942, Mookerjee wrote to the British governor of Bengal, John Herbert, laying out a plan to combat the Congress. “Anybody who, during the war, plans to stir up mass feelings, resulting in internal disturbances or insecurity, must be resisted by any government that may function for the time being,” promised Mookerjee. “As one of your Ministers, I am willing to offer you my whole-hearted cooperation and serve my province and country at this hour of crisis”.
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      1. B
        blackpower
        Jul 6, 2017 at 6:14 pm
        In 1939, Mahomed Ali Jinnah announced a Day of Deliverance to celebrate the resignation of eight provincial Congress ministries to protest the inclusion of India into World War II. So deep were the anti-colonial feelings in Bengal at the time that Abdur Rahman Siddique, a Bengali on the Muslim League’s working committee, resigned to protest Jinnah’s announcement calling it “an insult to national prestige” and a “flattery of British colonialism”. In circumstances like these, to have Mookerjee try and ingratiate himself in front of the British makes him an embarrassment rather than a leader to follow for modern India.
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      blackpower
      Jul 6, 2017 at 6:12 pm
      SP Mookerjee was a religious fundamentalist - Despite being academically accomplished and the son of the famous educationist Sir Ashutosh Mookerjee, SP Mookerjee was a far-right religious conservative. During the debilitating Bengal Famine of 1943-’44, one of the major concerns of the Mookerjee-led Hindu Mahasabha in Bengal was that government canteens, employing Muslim and lower caste cooks, made it impossible for many Hindus to eat without breaking caste – an amazingly petty consideration to have during a disaster in which around three million Bengalis died of hunger. Additionally, allegations of communal bias and corruption in its famine relief efforts were made against the Mahasabha by the Bengal government, reputed journalist TG Narayan of the Hindu, who covered the disaster, as well as famous artist Chittoprasad. At times, SP Mookerjee’s caste and communal biases would come together in a medley of bigotry.
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        blackpower
        Jul 6, 2017 at 6:12 pm
        For instance, in her book, Bengal Divided: Hindu communalism and Par ion 1932-1947, historian Joya Chatterji cited a note written by Mookerjee to show that he felt a sense of superiority as an upper caste Hindu “fed by the belief that Bengali Muslims were, by and large, ‘a set of converts’ from the dregs of Hindu society”. After Independence, SP Mookerjee would do his best to stymie the efforts of Nehru and Ambedkar to modernise Hindu law. He attacked pro-women measures such as the introduction of monogamy and divorce into Hindu law, which, he claimed, would “do away with the fundamental and sacred nature of Hindu marriage” and end up “killing the very fountain source of your [the Hindu] religion”. A person who was a bigot on caste, religion and gender is an unlikely model for India in 2016.
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        blackpower
        Jul 6, 2017 at 6:10 pm
        venkiah naidu is talking thru his hat wrt SP Mookerjee...Mookerjee believed in the two-nation theory and advocated the Par ion of Bengal: Mookerjee was also one of the first backers of a plan to par ion Bengal and played a key role in preparing bhadralok opinion in favour of it. This was an emotive issue and as recently as 1905, Bengal’s leading figures had fought tooth and nail against a colonial plot to par ion Bengal. But by 1946-’47 the increased communal situation and Hindu insecurity at being a minority in Bengal meant that many bhadraloks were coming around to considering the idea. This, of course, is an uncomfortable fact in modern India where any mention of support for Par ion is taboo. The Nehru Memorial exhibition tries to rationalise this by claiming that Mookerjee saved a “portion of Bengal especially the historical and strategically important city of Calcutta from becoming a part of Pakistan” – a strawman given that there was no British proposal of that sort.
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        1. B
          blackpower
          Jul 6, 2017 at 6:10 pm
          Mookerjee would also vehemently oppose plans for a united, independent Bengal being pushed by the Prime Minister of Bengal, Hussain Suhrawardy, and the two major Congress leaders in Bengal, Sarat Chandra Bose (older brother of Subhash Chandra Bose) and Kiran Sankar Roy. Mookerjee preferred a communal Par ion as per the two-nation theory instead. Mookerjee soon realised what a disaster Bengal’s par ion was and, by 1951, was asking for it to be annulled – easier said than done given that by then East Bengal was a part of Pakistan. This cynical U-turn, though, didn’t help him and in the 1952 elections, the Jana Sangh won less than 4 of the seats in the West Bengal state Assembly. Later, the main sufferers of Par ion, Hindu immigrants from East Bengal, would form the backbone of the Communist Party of India (Marxist) even as Hindutva politics nearly went extinct in the state.
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          Amit Singh
          Jul 6, 2017 at 2:55 pm
          Who decides what are national ethos? Bjp rss vhp gaurakshaks? No. These people are anti national and working against the nation since their inception
          Reply