Desire for attention drive both women, men: Emily Ratajkowski

Emily Ratajkowski says desire to get noticed is equal in both men and women, but the latter faces criticism and gets scrutinized for it.

By: PTI | Los Angeles | Published:September 7, 2016 8:35 pm
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Model-actress Emily Ratajkowski says desire to get noticed is equal in both men and women, but the latter faces criticism and gets scrutinized for it.

In her essay for Glamour magazine’s October 2016 issue, the “Gone Girl” actress said the society does not questions actions of men, but if a women decides to give her opinion she is judged.

“It’s absurd to think that desire for attention doesn’t drive both women and men. Why are women scrutinized for it more, then? And if a woman dresses up because she does want attention, male or otherwise, does that make her guilty of something? Or less “serious”?

“Our society doesn’t question men’s motivations for taking their shirt off, or shaving, or talking about politics—nor should it. Wanting attention is genderless. It’s human,” Ratajkowski wrote.

The 25-year-old actress gave reference of the pop culture where if Mick Jagger’s shirt is open its a part of the act and if Madonna does it she is acting desperate.

“Look at pop culture: Mick Jagger is 73, and he still sometimes wears his shirt open and gyrates onstage. We understand that this is a part of his performance and artistic brand. Meanwhile, when Madonna, who is 58 and a revolutionary in that same kind of artistic sexuality, wears a sheer dress to the Met Gala, critics call her “a hot mess” who is “desperate.”

“But isn’t she just making one of her signature political statements about female sexuality (and, incidentally, about our ageist, sexist culture too)? In any case, they are both performers who undoubtedly like attention. So why does Madonna get flak for it while Jagger is celebrated?” she continued.

Ratajkowski also opened up about the harsh criticism she received following her vocal support of former Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders.

“I realized then that I’ve been called an attention whore so often that I had almost gotten used to it. And as women we are accused of seeking attention more than men are, whether for speaking out politically, as I did, for dressing a certain way, or for even posting a selfie.

“Our culture has a double standard that runs so deep, many women have actually built up an automatic defense— attempting to be a step ahead of potential critics by making sure we have “real” reasons for anything we say or do.”