Monday, Sep 22, 2014

Music review Kaanchi: Subhash Ghai’s latest offering is anything but magical

Kaanchi The music of Subhash Ghai’s films has always been its biggest strength. Be it Taal or even the less popular, Yuvraaj and Kisna, each film has presented a melodious album. But Ghai’s latest offering, Kaanchi is anything but magical.
Written by Priya Adivarekar | Mumbai | Posted: April 25, 2014 1:00 am | Updated: April 25, 2014 3:48 pm

 

The music of Subhash Ghai’s films has always been its biggest strength. Be it Taal or even the less popular, Yuvraaj and Kisna, each film has presented a melodious album. But Ghai’s latest offering, Kaanchi is anything but magical.

Music directors Ismail Darbar and duo Salim-Sulaiman Merchant have given the score, while Ghai has worked as the composer and lyricist on one song. Irshad Kamil has penned the lyrics for the rest.

The title song’s opening has an uncanny resemblance to Hum hain is pal yahan. It is a feel-good song, with lots of zest and a flavour of patriotism. Darbar tries his best to make the track sound unique, but it is not. Sukhwinder Singh and the chorus do a good job. Sonu Nigam and Anweshaa come together for Tu sab kuch hai, a romantic number with confused beats, especially the use of the manjira, which goes out of sync in some places. One fails to understand if this song is trying to be soothing or peppy. Avoid it!

Subhash Ghai’s composition, Main mushtanda has a cool, hip-hop feel. But we must ask the director, what’s with the lyrics? They are crass. Roping in Mika, who does a good job in his department, also doesn’t help save this one. Aishwarya’s vocals and Earl Edgar’s rap are average.

Kambal ke neeche follows the same path, attempting to do something unique, but end up using lyrics from some of Ghai’s most popular songs. It’s an item number that won’t pull you towards the dance floor. Nor will Thumka in Nigam and Suzzanne D’Mello’s voice. Although the song has decent musical arrangements and a contemporary base, the lyrics falter.
Ankit Tiwari’s Kaisa hai dard mera is better off as a lullaby. It does nothing to engage you. The patriotic number, Hindustan kahan hai, follows the previous sad song. Singh and Mohit Chauhan sing this track well, but the melody is strictly okay, best suited for the situation it is picturised on. Koshampa, in Sanchita Bhattacharya and Anweshaa’s voice, starts off with the tunes of Saare jahan se aacha and we hear Ghai singing a few lines. It’s an outdated melody, with a completely confused mix of folksy tunes. Bhattacharya and Avril Quadros do a good job in Adiye adiye, which is okay. We suggest you skip this album and hear a well-composed folk album instead.

Song  Review

Revolver Rani

Attack of the 80s

Title track

This one takes you back in time. Revolver Rani’s title track is everything that music lovers have heard back in the 80s. Disco beats, dialogue baazi from popular, dramatic films and a powerful rendition by Usha Uthup; this one has everything going for it. One hear and you are certain to get transported to the hinterland, with continued…

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