House Of Lies / Titillating fare

While the series is full of drama and high-end histrionics, the only jarring note, is the idea that it propounds — if things don’t work in the boardroom, make it work in the bedroom.

Mumbai | Updated: February 19, 2014 3:12 pm
(Clockwise from left) Kristen Bell, Don Cheadle, Dawn Olivieri, Josh Lawson and Ben Schwartz in House of Lies (Clockwise from left) Kristen Bell, Don Cheadle, Dawn Olivieri, Josh Lawson and Ben Schwartz in House of Lies

Cast: Don Cheadle, Kristen Bell, Ben Schwartz, Josh Lawson, Donis Leonard Jr.
Comedy Central, Monday – Wednesday, 10 pm

By Farida Khanzada

The end justifies the means, that is the basic premise of this risqué corporate American drama, House of Lies. The television series is created by Matthew Carnahan and is based on the book, House of Lies: How Management Consultants Steal Your Watch and Then Tell You the Time, written by Martin Kihn, a former consultant at Booz Allen Hamilton. It follows a group of management consultants who stop at nothing to get business deals done.
Moving ahead from the other two seasons, the third season charts the journey of these four savvy glib talkers, who would stoop at nothing to achieve their goal. Afer breaking away from Galweather & Steam one of the leading management consultancy firm in the US in the earlier seasons, Marty Kaan (Don Cheadle) forms his own company Pod. His crooked brain is always upto new ideas, devising schemes, dangling the proverbial carrot to companies facing rough weather with the promise to bail them out with his fantabulous plans. Working in tandem are his three assistants, which includes Jeannie (Kristen Bell), Clyde (Ben Swartz), and Doug (Josh Lawson). The quartet are always on the prowl to bait the big fish, week after week, across the American continent. Their modus operandi includes flattering the client and making them believe that their company is good, which could become the best if they hired them as management consultants. They impress the client with impressive facts and figures, using indecipherable jargon that could flummox any Harvard University professor.
While the series is full of drama and high-end histrionics, the only jarring note being the idea that it propounds — if things don’t work in the boardroom, make it work in the bedroom. In each episode, there is a good display of nudity, which at times tend to repel. Marty’s libido is always ready to burst at the slightest show of legs. Especially repulsive was the scene when Marty compromises his son, Roscoe’s (Donis Leonard Jr) happiness by coaxing him to swap his role with a girl, to play a songstress in his school production, just so that the father can assuage his sexual desires with the mother of the girl!
Although the basic premise of the series is to show how management consultants fool corporates into believing that they are indispensable, one wonders if this what what management consultants do to achieve their goals in real life? More than the drama, the series looks like a soft porn drama unravelling on television.
Verdict: Definitely not meant for family viewing.

 

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