Tum Bin 2 movie review: It’s an instant throwback to the first film with similar plot-lines

Tum Bin 2 movie review: Neha Sharma and Aditya Seal star in a love story which is an instant throwback to the first film. But unlike Tum Bin, it fails to mix the elements wisely despite delivering some well executed moments.

Rating: 1.5 out of 5
Written by Shubhra Gupta | New Delhi | Updated: November 19, 2016 8:43 am
 Tum Bin 2 movie review, Tum Bin 2 review, Tum Bin 2, Tum Bin 2 movie, Neha Sharma, Aditya Seal Tum Bin 2 movie review: Two guys, one girl, and the mess they can create amongst themselves can make for an interesting story. That is not the case with Tum Bin sequel.

Tum Bin 2 movie cast: Neha Sharma, Aditya Seal, Aashim Gulati, Kanwaljit Singh
Tum Bin 2 movie director: Anubhav Sinha

Tum Bin 2 comes 15 years after the first one (Tum Bin), and is an instant throwback to the same space and similar plot-points: foreign locations, an accident, a guilt-ridden protagonist, and young love.

Amar (Aashim Gulati) and Taran (Neha Sharma) love each other, and then something terrible happens, and he drops out of the picture. She grieves and mopes, along with Amar’s `papaji’ (Kanwaljit Singh) and her two sisters, and then one day the personable young Shekhar (Aditya Seal) turns up on their doorstep, and things start to change.

Two guys, one girl, and the mess they can create amongst themselves may be the oldest story in the book, but it can quite easily be refreshed given the right story and treatment. Unlike the first one which brought these elements together nicely, it doesn’t happen here, despite some well executed moments.

Also read | Never wanted a comparison with the original film, says Tum Bin 2 actor Aashim Gulati 

The family — Taran and her sisters, and their (‘the sisters’) significant others — feels real. They eat and joke and squabble just like regular people do. One of the sisters is in love with a fellow who belongs to, gulp, a certain neighbouring country we are currently not very happy with. Some fun is to be had in the way that relationship is brought out, and the lighthearted jibes about Indians and Pakistanis make us smile.

Watch | Tum Bin 2 Starcast On The Making Of The Movie

There’s also an attempt to establish that first loves may not be for ever, and how it is perfectly possible, even acceptable, to move on. You start paying attention, hoping that the film will go down that path, and then wham, a lid comes down on that thread.

There’s a cop-out and it goes right back into old, old ways of settling such unseemly conflict: understanding vibes between the two men who decide for the girl what she really wants, an over-cooked plot garnished with lots of contrivances, and swelling violins which tell us that it’s time to bring the glycerine out.