Shut In movie review: Psychologists never had it so bad

Shut In movie review: There is so much potential in this Naomi Watts film, but it's incomprehensible.

Rating: 1 out of 5
Written by Shalini Langer | New Delhi | Updated: November 18, 2016 6:54 pm
Shut In, Naomi Watt Shut In movie review: There is so much potential in this Naomi Watts film, but its incomprehensible.

Shut In movie director: Farren Blackburn

Shut In movie cast: Naomi Watts, Oliver Pratt, Charlie Heaton, Jacob Tremblay,

Teenage sons, distraught mothers, clinical psychologists, and Naomi Watts have rarely had it so bad. Mary (Watts) is taking care of her 18-year-old son, Stephen (Charlie Heaton), all alone ever since he was paralysed from the neck down following an accident that killed her husband. It’s been six months in a snow-bound, desolate New England home, and Mary has started believing there is a presence in the house. That presence mostly centres around a young boy, Tom (Jacob Tremblay), partially hearing impaired, who had been brought to her care in her capacity as a clinical psychologist. There must be a link between Tom’s condition and him being brought to a psychologist, but the film doesn’t bother with it.

Mary is also disturbed and feeling guilty as the task of looking after Stephen is tiring her out, and she is planning to put him in a home. She is having dreams where she sees herself drowning Stephen in the bath-tub, and locking him out in the snow. There is so much potential here, but it’s incomprehensible the direction the film eventually decides to take. And persist with, even when Mary’s clinical capabilities are put into serious question by how many clues she missed.