Pinneyum movie review: Adoor Gopalakrishnan disappoints as film stuck in theatrical mode

Pinneyum movie review: Despite good performances by Dileep and Kavya Madhavan, Adoor Gopalakrishnan film fails due to obvious flaws in script and dialogues.

Rating: 3 out of 5
Written by Goutham VS | Thiruvananthapuram | Updated: September 9, 2016 12:59 pm
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After watching an Adoor Gopalakrishnan movie, it’s difficult to distance yourself from the important questions the movie raises. Alas then, Pinneyum (Again) — the legendary director’s latest work — stays firmly behind in the theatre as you walk out, primarily because it gets stuck in the cause-and-effect reasoning of why things happen in this world.

One of the original sins, greed, is the crux of Pinneyum. In a dysfunctional Nair family, a man is struggling to find his place in the world while his wife earns to run the household. Adoor’s films revolve around these familiar themes and thanks to his keen understanding of human mind and signature cynicism, his works have a touch of authenticity. However, in Pinneyum, the script is oddly theatrical and seems to be detached from the characters.

Purushothaman Pillai (Dileep) is an unemployed man in his thirties who is used to accepting all kinds of barbs with meek docility. He finally steps out to prove himself when his wife (Kavya Madhavan) also hurts his self-esteem. But the necessity to prove himself soon turns into greed and he does something that will lead to a catastrophe.

It all unfolds in a dramatic and linear narrative. The setting and dialogues are reminiscent of Shyamaprasad’s movie Arike, also a Dileep-starrer, which had a dramatic tone than a cinematic one. The dialogues expressing Purushothaman’s love for his wife and Devi’s denial of the same are overemphasised in Pinneyum and yet that as a plot line is not explored enough. The dialogues remain peripheral to the story and sound silly when repeated.

Shallowness in dialogue delivery by some supporting actors accentuated the film’s melodramatic atmosphere, which starts feeling comic after a while. Srinda who plays Purushothaman Pillai’s sister and the actress who plays his daughter in the latter part of the film are particularly disappointing.

The conversation between the interview board members in the opening scene and a police enquiry scene at Pillai’s house lack the cinematic perfection we would expect from a filmmaker like Adoor. The veteran director also seems to sympathise with upper castes who fail to get jobs due to caste-based reservations.

Kavya’s character Devi is supposed to be a woman who is living her miserable life in silence. But Adoor shows that Purushothaman’s downfall begins because Devi changes her attitude based on his fortune. Adoor, thereby, impresses the age-old notion that a woman pushes a man into evil or as the sexist saying in Malayalam goes, “Kanaham moolam, Kamini moolam, kalaham palavidham ulakil sulabham (Owing to wealth and women, the world is full of conflict).”

Both Dileep and Kavya give satisfying performances as do Vijayaraghavan, Nedumudi Venu and Indrans. Bijibal’s background score is intense and heightens the tension as the movie nears the climax.

Pinneyum is certainly not Adoor’s best visual expedition, but like his earlier works, the film tries to explore the human psyche through a very ordinary narrative technique.

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  1. A
    A.V.Vijayan
    Aug 22, 2016 at 2:26 pm
    It is not that much bad.It is a linear narration. So what?.Even lay man gets the feeling and message,It does not become the sole property of the so called 'high brows'.Kavy has done a wonderful job and deserves a national award.So does Indrans. The frames are excellent. The The Photography, Editing. Sound recording are as in Adoor films superb.The last parts of the film is done in clicstyle. But the attachment of Sukumarakurup's incident was not in Adoor's caliber.Moreover the the village retired school teacher and the retd military person suddenly turning hardcore criminals is not at all convincing.Leave alone these, it is a good film which you can enjoy.
    Reply
  2. P
    prakash
    Aug 28, 2016 at 10:13 am
    An old wine in a old bottle.The actors are toys under the comtrol of director.it is not a picture but drama
    Reply